13

Yes, provided you use fiberglass, and the technique is often called "cedar strip construction". This method of construction is a very forgiving method of building small boats compared to other techniques. Pretty much any wood will work, though cedar and other rot-resistant woods are better because when you invariably bump into rocks or other stuff, and ...


10

The apron on a four legged table serves a number of functions, and you may not have considered them all. The apron: stiffens the top, helping to keep it flat transfers the load to the legs connects the legs to each other and keeps them vertical connects the top to the base (i.e. legs + apron) in a large table, supports stretchers that support the top in the ...


9

So a good question for here would be are softwoods suitable or practicable for use as bench tops? Yes. Obviously softwoods are generally fairly soft and a bench made from softwood is going to be more prone to denting than one made of e.g. hard maple (a very popular choice in the US) but this could actually be considered a desirable trait rather than a ...


9

The box size would be height=400mm, length=800mm, width=400mm, made of 10mm plywood. Say the max load on boxes when used as benches = turned open side down is 200kg and the load when used as a box is 50kg max. I'm going to convert to Imperial units since that's how my brain works. This is about 16" x 32" x 16" and 3/8" plywood, ...


8

I would build the support frame for under the boxes, just the frame (out of treated 2x4's). Then find your where you want the boxes to rest. Then you scribe your 2x4's with a compass. You get your frame some what level, then set the compass (generally to the max gap, but only if you want the whole frame resting on the ground) and go around with the ...


7

Expanding to an actual answer. Typically finish nails are, as indicated by the name, for finishing touches. I.e. trim, face materials, etc. They are not structural, and are often used in conjunction with other stronger methods. As I understand you question there are a couple of options Counter-sink screws periodically to provide additional structural ...


7

In terms of compression strength, I wouldn't want to park a big car on top of it - but even a couple of drunken teenagers jumping up and down should be fine. As others have commented, racking side-to-side might have been a concern if you didn't have walls either side. That could easily be addressed by attaching a plywood skin to the back (but it doesn't ...


6

While a 1/4" pair of dowels would likely be able to hold a guitar if left alone, a good twisting bump might break them off. A 1/2" dowel would be plenty, and I think a 3/4" dowel (at 3-4") would be able to hold me without breaking (200 lbs.) I would recommend 1/2" since that would be plenty strong and still small enough not to be obvious for your display. ...


6

Honestly if the glue-up is done right I don't think this is going to matter much, or at all. Following on from the same principle as sprung-jointed edges (where a very slight hollow is deliberately planed on board edges) you might like to have the cup in between. Obviously in this case you need to take pains to have sufficient clamp pressure in the centre ...


5

I've just done a bit of research (OK... I did a google image search, but the results seem to be consistent) and it seems like the logo is always burned into / painted onto the same part of the bat, in relation to the grain direction: Notice that the logo is in the same orientation as the growth ring lines of the bat. This makes a lot of sense in the context ...


5

Is there any truth to breaking a bat by hitting on the trademark Yes there is. Traditionally the logo or label is located in a specific orientation to the grain in the wood, leading to the guideline that the logo should face the sky or the ground ("logo up or logo down") meaning you would be hitting the ball at 90° to the position of the logo. As one ...


5

Is spruce wood a good choice ? Or maybe I should choose a stronger one ? Wood species Spruce is one of the strongest woods in the world for its weight. Beds of a similar design to yours have been made from other softwoods, including pine and fir, which are not nearly as strong, so I think spruce is a fine choice and you're lucky you have a source of it. ...


5

I think the most sturdy way to put a bottom in a box is to capture it with grooves on the sides. With a rabbet the glue joint is holding the bottom on, while in a groove the structure of the wood itself is holding the bottom in place. For added strength I would make the bottom out of plywood (so it doesn't change size) and glue it into the grooves. This ...


4

If you're looking for a simple project you might consider a skin on frame canoe or kayak. Cedar is a good choice for skin boats and actually works better when it's 'green'. Take a look at skin-boats.com to get some ideas.


4

I am personally not a bit fan of spruce (or pine, or anything the like) for anything but a tool shack in my garden, or similar. But sure enough, spruce is quite resilient. You can most certainly certainly make a bed from that material, which will easily support two people. For the most part, this is a matter of personal preference. For someone who is ...


4

I don't see why not. Some of it depends on what kind of abuse you expect it to take and if you expect it to stay 'pretty'. One of my bench tops I made out of 2x6's left over from building the garage. I ran them through the joiner and planner to square them up and it is a very solid bench that can take a lot of abuse. It also happens to be significantly ...


4

The weakest part of the design is how your substantial load is being carried to the uprights. There's not that much you can do for those joints as drawn... I'd suggest you add actual 1x2 members beside your existing uprights that will carry the weight of the frame (perimeter) of each shelf. It's easy to build this way, and will look a little less spindly. (...


4

Each shelf is capable of holding the load that you are intending with shearing or sagging. Where this design fails is in racking, both front to back and side to side. Traditional shelves are built with solid sides and a back. This serves to hold books, or items onto the shelves, but this really is only a secondary function. Primarily, the solid sides and ...


4

For starters I would look into half lapping the interior cross members. This way you can have just two supports running the length of the bed, as opposed to ten small pieces running between each cross support. This eliminates any need for screws in your interior cross member supports. This is very much like building a torsion box. I would also recommend ...


4

That's a cantilever design It looks like someone (or somecat) has put more weight on it than it is capable of supporting (was it located somewhere a child might have been tempted to try it?) After repairing the split (disassemble, glue and screws or clamp, reassemble) I would add some bracing struts to the underside, secured to the wall.


4

Like you, I have built a great deal, but I am not a structural engineer so my recommendations are more intuitive than definitive. I would recommend extending the length of the scabs as much as possible. If you are creating the arches from 10' framing I would use the same for the scab and cut it to the curve. I would apply fasteners 1' OC. staggered top ...


4

Is support on three sides of a long poplar bookshelf enough? Yes, but see note. Unless you expect to heavily load only the front edge of the shelf (seems unlikely!) it should be OK. Shelves installed this way are relatively common and while 94" is a very long shelf and poplar isn't a particularly stiff wood the rear support makes all the difference. You ...


4

If this is going into drywall the weakest point is probably the attachment of the wall flange to the wall. With regards to this joint design B is substantially better than design A, since in A the shelf can pivot out from the wall and apply a tension force to the anchors (i.e. pulling them out). In design B the shelf will be against the wall and the force ...


3

That is correct, the trademark side of the bat should not be used to hit the ball. The trademark is stamped on the weakest part of the bat - notice it's always in the same position with relation to the grain of the wood. Hitting the ball with this area has a higher chance of breaking the bat, since it's the weakest point on the bat. That's not to say that ...


3

The main structural elements (the columns and the beams) are big enough to support a horse. However the slats are inadequate. The first time that you and your partner decide to occupy the center of the mattress simultaneously and apply a dynamic load you are going find yourselves and the mattress occupying the desk. Normally a double bed would have another ...


3

can I somehow adapt the technique for walking cane. eg. make a dozen cylinder and glued them on top of each other You can, but I wouldn't recommend it. If you just glued cylinders end to end those joints are end grain to end grain, the weakest glue joint. You would need to reinforce the stick through the centre and drilling perfectly central deep holes ...


3

If you are looking for a way to get the butcher block effect in a cane (ie: stacked dowel blocks), the best way to accomplish this would be to create your dowel parts and drill them through the middle. Then use a threaded rod to hold the pieces together (along with glue) and provide extra strength. You'd have the handle of the cane also held together by the ...


3

First, my flat answer: For a 12' span backyard monkey bar set I'd use four clear (no knots) 2x8's - two each side. Use threaded pipe flanges screwed to the inner (hidden) face of the inner 2x8's (in a counterbore) to anchor pipe sections. Assemble inner 2x8s and pipe, then laminate the outer 2x8's onto the inner ones. Yes, that will be heavy, but not ...


3

The easiest way to prevent racking would be to replace the slats at the head and foot of the mattress supports with a solid piece of plywood approx 1' wide that is solidly connected to the three sides of the bed frame it contacts. I would also suggest that the pocket screws could be replaced with solid dowels as well. If you have a table saw and a dado ...


3

I plan on using 3/4 plywood (.706 or so) with 3/8" dowels and some pocket screws (as well as titebond). I don't want to over or under engineer it. Actually you should seek to over-engineer this, or at least err on the side of stronger than you think you need, because it can't hurt given the dynamic forces this might be subjected to over time. One key thing ...


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