12

Not a direct answer to your question but thought I'd add that if you can find a screw of suitable overall form but it's unfortunately not self-tapping you can modify them so that they are. Any screw can be modified to make it self-tapping, and the process is surprisingly easy. All that's required is to create clearance and effectively a cutting edge, or ...


12

One of the problems with putting wheels on a work bench, is it often isn't stable enough for some of the stuff we do on the bench (hand planing for instance). Rockler has a set of workbench casters that lock down to allow the bench to roll, but then can be popped up to put the bench back on its own legs for stability.


6

Everything I've read says you need to clamp a waste block on the end of your board to prevent the tear out. It is even recommended to do this if you are using a router or jointer. By keeping the pressure on with a waste block it won't be able to splinter down the board. Source Of course the other option would be to plane toward the center from both sides....


5

plane inwards from edges. chamfer the far edge and angle the plane. support the edge with sacrificial wood. use a shooting board.


5

I would use bolts, if I remember correctly I used bolts to attach wheels to my table/cart that I made, 12-14 years ago and they are still going fine. I attached them to 2x4's that were a part of the lower frame structure. They don't need to be real big, but by having the bolt go though something (with a good washer on either end) you can prevent the 'easy' ...


5

I think the best project is a simple rectangular box. You can teach good tablesaw and hand work practices as well as multiple joining techniques in a project that is completed in a couple classes and like your current suggestions gives them a useful home item or gift. You will also address mortices, dados, and techniques for mounting hinges. A simple finger ...


4

I like to suggest as early or starter woodworking projects the making of a few of the key jigs or 'workshop aids' as they used to be called. In addition to most being very simple to make to a high standard with almost no experience every one of them can immediately be put to use to help in the making of other things so it's a win-win proposition. Principal ...


4

The important parts are to have self-tapping screws (unless you want to do a little predrilling before using the screws, not recommended) and having a flat surface on the bottom of the head. Depending on what you expect it to need to bear, most screws would handle this fairly well. However, the Kreg pocket hole screws are HARD. Your average deck screw is ...


4

It depends on the wheels and load, and without more information on what exactly failed (wood? Screws? Wheel?) it will be hard to give you an answer specific to your problem. When I built my large worktable, I had 4x4 posts as legs, but they were still too small for the 500lb rated load wheels I wanted to use, so added 2x4's wrapped around the legs to end up ...


3

Support the bolt that you're using as an axle on both sides. In other words, don't cantilever the wheels. This will reduce the moment the bolt is applying to the wooden frame to effectively zero (it takes its "leverage" away).


1

I know this is an old question, but I recently had to solve this problem myself, so maybe I can help someone who finds this later. I used the SPAX screws, 1-1/4" Long for 3/4" stock. They are REAR PANEL screws, and they have a 3/8" head. $3 for a box of 30, and it took me about 15 mins to modify them all. Not great time-wise, but batching them out helps, ...


1

I've made several rough projects where, just for practice, I used pocket screws, including a couple sawhorses, a little outside bench for taking off shoes, and my own workbench. Each time, I actually just used regular drywall screws instead of the Kreg screws, for convenience and (a very little bit of) money saving -- not because they're at all the right ...


1

From what I can see of the pocket screws and their intended purpose you can find similar properties in screws that have pan or truss like heads. Basically a wide head with a flat bottom. You can also get screws with washer heads. I ended getting screws advertised as Particle Board screws. They had a washer head and looked similar to this. The ones I ...


1

I would not rely on just common wood screws to hold something heavy... lag bolts with washers can be used the same way but they will bite into more wood and be less likely to be pulled out..


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible