10

This was then glued onto a plywood top. This isn't what you asked about but you might want to stop right there. You will likely run into problems if you glued solid wood firmly to a dimensionally stable material like plywood. Some allowance for seasonal movement must be made or the wood will strain against the glue and can crack itself free or will bow or ...


10

Why go through with all the hassle of combining two slim boards, and not just purchase and use a thicker 2x4? Cost Wood of smaller dimensions can be cheaper, cheap enough that two smaller pieces can be cheaper than the one thicker piece. This is one of the prime motivations to do laminations and glue-ups. In wood sales generally wider material is sold at a ...


8

My question is, why use so many F-style clamps rather than just 3-4 parallel bar clamps that would cover the entire surface? Probably the simplest explanation is to spread the clamping force more uniformly. Although this can be done using fewer larger clamps too, with use of clamping blocks, which appear to be in the photograph anyway. Side note: I glued ...


7

Is there any problem or surprise waiting for me if I laminate the boards in this way? Not if you glue them together properly, no. Properly here means well-jointed faces on both pieces (flat and smooth), ample glue, heavy clamp pressure. Also highly advisable to work the wood just prior to the glue-up as fresh surfaces glue much better than old surfaces. ...


7

Laminate from veneers that are thin enough to bend the radius cold Solid wood kerfed on the inside face Steam bent solid wood But my best bet looking at the style of that piece would be many partial circles cut from MDF glued in stacks, sanded, and veneered on the surfaces. Overlapping shorter segments would make more efficient use of the material than full ...


7

Needs to be food safe, durable and easy to clean. I know that beech is a good material to use as I have a beech chopping board at home, but would it make it even more durable / easy to clean by oiling the board e.g. with mineral oil? No. What it will do is introduce a 'finish' that never dries and needs to be topped up periodically for the entire service ...


6

Wood has a tendency to warp. Depending upon the orientation of the grain in individual boards it can do so in a variety of ways (see an answer to this question for a picture of some of the ways. The way the board will warp is dependent upon its grain orientation. An answer to this question diagrams how the grain appears for various types of warping. By ...


6

Honestly if the glue-up is done right I don't think this is going to matter much, or at all. Following on from the same principle as sprung-jointed edges (where a very slight hollow is deliberately planed on board edges) you might like to have the cup in between. Obviously in this case you need to take pains to have sufficient clamp pressure in the centre ...


6

My plan was to basically put them on a flat surface, glue them up and clamp them together. Obviously this is a rough idea and I am looking for some advice before I glue myself to the floor. There's nothing essentially wrong with your plan, but there are some minor modifications that will make it go more smoothly. On a substantial glued panel like this, ...


5

The simplest way is to just glue the boards together. Making sure all the pieces are square. You can glue a short piece to a longer piece and then glue the next piece to both of them making it out to the 5' mark. (or maybe a couple to get the full length. If you have a 15" wide planer it makes it easy at the end to run it through to even out the top/...


5

I suppose a professional approach would be to laminate or veneer the particle board (True veneer might not be a good idea if this is a rough use shelf. There are many peel and stick ones. Need to have a good clean surface). If you look that is what most selves, like bookshelves are essentially. That would make for an easy to clean surface. You can buy sheets ...


5

Needs to be food safe, durable and easy to clean. I know that beech is a good material to use as I have a beech chopping board at home, but would it make it even more durable / easy to clean by oiling the board e.g. with mineral oil? Is this still food safe etc? Is there anything else I need to watch out for with this? Beech is a fine choice for a chopping ...


4

If the two boards are fully glued, they will act as a single unit and will not affect the strength of the screw connection, so go ahead. On the other hand, a glued (mortise & tenon) connection between the posts and plywood beam will perform better than a pocket screw connection. In a glued connection, the stresses created whenever the bed frame is ...


3

I could use a 2x3 or 2x4, but am wondering if I could create the larger piece by gluing two or more smaller boards together as that would be cheaper This is a good and economical way of making up larger sections on a budget. While it may not look as nice as a single piece it'll be at least as strong if you do it right. It's not absolutely vital but good ...


3

I called System Three and they were very helpful - they strongly recommended only epoxying wood that's reached it's equilibrium moisture content and not in any environment where it could be exposed to water. The issue is that as the wood expands and contracts, the brittle epoxy is more likely than not to crack or tear the bonded surface off, obviating any ...


3

Are you going to be in an environment with large fluctuations of humidity and temperature, perhaps outside the range of comfortable human habitation? This is just a gut feeling, based on secondary experiences over time, but the combination you're suggesting has quite a bit going for it. The plywood is, of course, a series of laminations of wood, with grain ...


3

A colleague of mine has just come up with a good suggestion so I thought I'd post it as an answer so that anybody looking at this in the future could see it: Use a pre-made kitchen worktop. You can buy a 3-metre length for around £80 ($120ish) and it's already glued up dead flat and straight. Just be careful to get something that is solid timber and pay ...


3

Depending on the size and how many gaps you have, you could try a Dutchman or Butterfly patch.


3

One sure way to join end-to-end pieces in a lamination is to use scarf joints (also called scarph joints). source You can readily cut the joints by making tapered cuts on your table saw by using a commercial jig or by using a homemade jig. Of course, there are many different commercial offerings and, likewise,many different ways to construct your own. ...


2

If you offset the places where each layer of laminate butts together -- like a "running bond" in brickwork -- you can distribute the weakness of the butt joints across the piece. Ideally no two of them would line up, but even if every other row lines up as with the bricks the much stronger long-grain to long-grain glue lines between layers will hold things ...


2

Rather than simply butting the joints, try to lap the ends of connecting boards by cutting the ends on a steep bevel or creating a lap joint. A table saw can get you up to 45 degrees where the angled length matches the board thickness. If the board is not wider than the height of your blade you can increase the length of the angled edge by using a jig. OF ...


2

You could use come CA-glue and a cherry sawdust to fill gaps


2

I'm not sure if you realize, but that's going to be one heavy top, at 1.5" thick x 15" deep x 60" long. As far as the how, you can do it in sub-assemblies. Basically, build up some smaller 4 or 5 board length sub-sections, and laminate them together.


2

To answer the first part of your question, the glue adhesion should be more than adequate to handle the weight from the 2x6. This is both because the glue is more than strong enough to bind the four pieces together and the weight can easily be carried by the inner 1x4s so no load even has to transfer to the outer ones. The outer boards are only used to ...


2

Part of the answer depends upon the size of the piece, its thickness, and possibly the number of layers in the panel. I do not know any hard and fast rules for making a determination but here are some considerations. The grain in each layer is set perpendicular so that strength in the panel resists the tendency of adjacent layers to curl as moisture and ...


2

Your best bet would be to see if you can rough up the surface inside with a very thin file, and then apply some wood glue between the layers. Then, clamp the hell out of it and give it a day to cure. You can trim or sand off the excess, and you should be good to go. If that fails, you can clean out the gap again, and use a 2-part epoxy. Loctite makes an ...


2

I was going to tack this on the end but I think I should start with it since it may supersede all the below. Re. the warped boards, because of the great strength and stability of the completed glued-up panel it can be perfectly fine to have a few cupped or twisted boards in the mix. Source: Woodsmith Magazine As long as you follow a few basic rules of ...


2

The question is, how flat do I need the glued faces to be? Since you're joining face to face pretty flat is good enough. If you were joining edge to edge it would be more critical, because boards are stiffer in that direction and it's harder to deflect them when clamping to account for any unevenness. But boards readily bend in the opposite axis, so ...


1

As a rule of thumb, when laminating or veneering any panel, you want to keep it balanced, meaning applying the same, or close to equal finishes to each side. For one sided, good one side panels, we will apply a backer to the unfinished backside to maintain a balanced panel. If you have laminate on the face, you ideally want a laminate on the backside. The ...


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