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8

I would be quite concerned with wood movement in this design. You will be bonding epoxy (which doesn't move seasonally) directly to the end grain of wood. Since the wood will be expanding and contracting but the epoxy won't I would expect one or the other (or both) to crack or buckle. I would suggest either redesigning the piece so that the epoxy is ...


7

Ive looked everywhere for table legs which I can screw into the wood but every table leg I see needs a minimum depth of 25mm for the wood, whereas my wood is much thinner at 18mm. For my Imperial unit friends, 25mm = 1", and 18mm = 11/16". Assuming you want to keep this as simple as possible, is there any reason you can't screw through the top of the table ...


6

18mm isn't actually particularly thin, many smaller pieces use 1/2" material (roughly 13mm) for their tops and numerous sizeable tables have tops 18mm thick or less. For tables, legs are almost never truly attached directly to the underside of the top, they are most commonly attached to something (a batten or a mounting flange of some sort) or made into a ...


6

Do pocket hole screws allow for proper expansion and contraction in planked table tops? It completely depends on where they're sited. They're perfectly acceptable in some places and utterly wrong in others. Refer to this previous Question, What general considerations do I need to take into account for wood movement? for more info on that regard with some ...


6

I don't think that any of your proposed solutions really address the heart of the problem. The core issue here is that the material you used for the top is not rigid enough. 1/2" ply is not generally thick enough for large structures like table tops and cabinet boxes. For that you'd really want to use at least 3/4" (19mm) ply. (Typically 1/2" material is ...


5

What is the strongest join for splayed legs? As is almost always the case with this type of question there is no one clear winner. There are numerous joints — including some unconventional/less seen choices — that would be strong enough, which is all that's needed. Also, the particular joint chosen would be dictated by the form of the apron (if any) and ...


5

How complicated do you want to make the construction? Note that under the third table we see that it has aprons. Those are undoubtedly mortise-and-tenioned into the legs, which is quite a strong joint (lots of long-grain glue surface). The table's top then rests on this frame. You might make that stronger by drawbore-pinning the tenions, but you'd need to ...


5

will pocket hole screws allow the table to expand and contract as it is supposed to? I'm assuming you built something that was fastened together along the lines of this (source) where you used pocket screws to attach the individual boards together. You mentioned that you are switching to more movement-capable fasteners to attach the table top to the base,...


5

We have to be careful in advising you here since what you mean by "warp" may not match the commonly accepted definition. Some people use the term generically to refer to boards that aren't flat along their length, rather than to describe a specific kind of curvature to which the word more accurately refers. You can sometimes improve on this by dampening one ...


5

There are several issues to address in fabricating such a table top. First, as you pointed out is wood movement. The plywood base will not have any appreciable movement in either direction while the pine planks will expand across their width. If the two are attached, the difference must be made up at each board, where it is very small. I suspect that is ...


5

This design is plenty stout and has lots of extra strength built in to cope with material inconsistency and intermittent stresses put upon it. Those are excellently beefy pegged mortise and tenon joints in good proportion to the project. This method of joinery has been the gold standard for hundreds of years of solid furniture making and if built with even a ...


4

I was wondering how I could make a table similar. You can't really, and shouldn't try. Making a table that looks similar is easy enough, but actually laminating solid wood to plywood is inherently a flawed methodology. Even when you do this with veneer it can cause bowing if it's not done correctly, and veneer is extremely thin, so it's easy to imagine the ...


4

Table slides are those pieces of wood that join the two halves of a table and support the leaves. The bigger the opening the more pieces necessary for each slide (Normally two slides per table, each made of two to several pieces of wood that mate in dovetail slots and rails.) The slide set shown here employs rack and pinion mechanisms to assure that the ...


4

Can I use half-lap joint for table breadboard? Yes of course you can, the picture you included shows that, the real question is whether you should :-) That there are very few other tables with breadboards ends attached this way should tell you something. We don't know important details of the Lumberjocks project you posted as there are no build pics ...


4

The main purpose for the breadboard feature is cover the end grain edge of the top and to keep the top surface from curling across its width by locking it into the plane of the breadboard edge piece. The most common way to do this is with a mortise and tenon. The problem that arises is that the top surface will expand and contract in width as the seasons ...


4

My current idea is just to have the leg basically fold into itself but I'm unsure how sturdy this would be. You can get around the obvious strength concern of a leg that folds in the centre by using bracing, but I think there are better ways to go about this as covered by the links below. In addition to using fewer hinges there are a few existing designs ...


4

Determine the displacement you wish for the legs. This measurement combined with the height, will allow you to calculate the angles required. To calculate the angle of the lower left corner of the white triangle, divide the height by the displacement. Use the resulting number to determine the arctangent, either by google or a calculator. For example, if the ...


3

Don't make the wedges out of plywood, but rather make them out of veneer. This allows you to have a solid tabletop, but still get the design you want. There is a video series by GuysWoodshop (think this project was a viewer project on Matt Cremona's channel) showing almost exactly what you're trying to do. Screenshot taken from part 6 of his video series


3

There are two sets of concerns you must address in designing the base for your desk. First, it is my understanding that you have three leg locations for the top, one each at the ends of the "L" and one at the corner intersection. In that case, your span between legs is as much as 70. The wood appears to be pine in which case the sag that will occur appears ...


3

Judging by the pictures and the movie, I'd say the problem is just warping of the pine boards. The fact that the boards are straight at the center (where they are screwed to the vertical legs) and only the edges are bent suggests that. It is possible that the aquarium environment is more humid than the rest of the house, making the warping worse. But this ...


3

Essentially: No. You make slabs flat by removing wood to obtain a flat surface, by planing or by using a carriage-guided router or by machine-sanding or some combination of these. Sometimes you can reduce how much wood is lost by dividing into smaller pieces and gluing back together later, but making the grain match up again is a challenge. See the related ...


3

In order to determine how and where to fasten wood parts together remember that wood expands and contracts differently in length (tree vertical), radially (from center to outside) and tangentially (generally parallel to growth rings) due to factors like temperature and moisture content. For most woods, change in length is negligible and radial movement is ...


3

I ran a span calculation for a 2x4 oak board at http://www.awc.org/codes-standards/calculators-software/spancalc using a 35psf live and dead load, the minimum setting available and got a result of 6 foot. Although this is a total load of 900lb., it should be noted that you could easily get several hundred lbs. on the top. I have a similar length long ...


3

Some general design/structural considerations for this type of project: While the design shown should be adequate for light loads, it may be helpful to others to understand the way the table works in transferring the loads to the base for future projects. The performance of the table joints under load will not depend upon the species of wood so much as the ...


3

The over-sized screw holes will certainly allow the table top to expand and contract without splitting. Even if the changes across the grain take up the slack allowed by the larger holes, the frame itself will likely flex enough to allow for the wood movement without splitting. I think the whole project is a winner - go for it.


3

Glue up strategy was pipe clamps alternating on top and bottom every foot. I also used biscuits. Alternating clamps top and bottom is a good way to help achieve a flat glue-up, but if you want to be absolutely sure you need to actually clamp the top flat somehow. You can do this with individual clamp pressure at each joint being glued (using just a C-clamp ...


3

There is no magic ratio to grab and be done with. I'm not aware of a set of 'rules of thumb' that apply universally. It depends on wood selection and maintaining the joints when they start to loosen and on the abuse the table will suffer, at the hands of users less inclined to be gentle (six-year-old boys come to mind). The strength of the wood in 'area z' ...


3

Strength should not be your concern. A butcher-block slab with a large unsupported span is likely to to fail - the vertically-oriented wood fibers will separate (which happens normally with moisture changes and is called checking) under any load. Your slab must be supported by an underlying structure which will prevent any flexing loads from being applied. ...


2

The main thing that I can see (apart from the bracing being a bit overkill) is that you probably want some small braces at the top of the legs where they meet the apron / top, in order to stop sideways wobble. A bridle (not bridal) joint for the legs is probably a good choice of joint, but if you want this table to last for years and years then some side ...


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