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8

You can get this flatter certainly, but you may not be able to get them totally flat or to get them to stay that way permanently — wood that has bowed can show a tendency to want to return to that shape. One method is to wet the cupped side and put the wood out in the sun to dry. A variation of this is to wet both side but have the wet side sit on grass ...


8

The most basic step is making a jig. Clamp the jig to your drill press table and you can just put in the blank press it up against the stops and drill down and put the piece on the result pile. You can also center-punch the holes before drilling. This will help align the drill bit to where the hole should go. Put some wood screws through a piece of scrap ...


7

Are you set on manufacturing these yourself? Because really, "best and most efficient" is to get a company with either large industrial machines or low cost labour to manufacturer this part for you. If you're limited to a standard drill (hand drill, drill press, etc.) then you're going to get the most efficiency by stacking the parts so that you can drill ...


6

The key to efficiency will not be how many parts you can stack, but rather, how quickly you can set up the next part for drilling. Set up a fixture with appropriate stops so it only takes a second to pull out the current part and drop the next one in and have it perfectly aligned. Group your parts into manageable batches (as Jasper suggested in a comment). ...


6

Pine is a wood that is notorious for not absorbing stain evenly. To begin with the lighter and darker portions of the grain have very different absorbencies (the existing dark parts of the grain are not very absorbent while the lighter parts are much more absorbent). In addition pine is one of a handful of woods that are unfortunately very prone to an effect ...


6

MDF is practically purpose-made for this application. It is very dimensionally stable, one of its prime selling points. And while it's not as stiff or strong as ply it is as a rule more stable these days (because of the falling standard of plywood, while MDF is easier to make to a reasonable standard consistently). As often mentioned MDF can bow under its ...


6

The paint isn't only used to identify the wood boards by lumber yards, but it's also used to seal of the end grain to slow down the drying process. Because exposed pores or tracheids on the end-grain surfaces promote too-rapid drying and result in checks, it is wise to coat the ends of boards to slow the moisture loss from the end grain. Almost any ...


6

I'll preface my comments by saying that finish choice is a very personal thing, what one person is comfortable using and living with (in terms of upkeep and periodic maintenance) another would not. And equally the second person's preferred finish will often not suit the first person's. The surface of the table is roughly 8x4 feet, and I'm worried about ...


5

Lumber mills mark their boards with different colors to quickly identify them. Generally you'd cut off the end of a board after ripping it to get a nice square end. Sanding works too but is a lot of work.


5

There is a product called "Clear Penetrating Epoxy Sealant", or CPES for short. It is basically a very thin 2-part epoxy. It is typically used for stabilizing rotten wood, but it can also be used as a sealant. I would imagine that it would harden the wood more than any other normal finish, since it is literally epoxy. It also takes paint very well.


4

MDF is much more likely to be flat and is relatively dimensionally stable - however it's not overly strong when running long unsupported distances. If the pelmet is attached at its top along the length then it should be fine. If you plan on only attaching it at the ends it will probably sag over time. (...usual concerns about formaldehyde off-gassing and ...


4

Local conditions will strongly influence this so it's impossible to give a reliable answer, but certainly you should be able to get more than one season from something like this regardless of the weather conditions. Even completely unprotected and exposed to plenty of wet weather pine won't rot away in just a year or two, although the laths are very thin so ...


4

Adding to Graphus's answer, you can also cut the board down the middle run them through a jointer and reglue them back together. If you can flip one side over for the join, you will reduce the max bow it is capable of.


4

Each shelf is capable of holding the load that you are intending with shearing or sagging. Where this design fails is in racking, both front to back and side to side. Traditional shelves are built with solid sides and a back. This serves to hold books, or items onto the shelves, but this really is only a secondary function. Primarily, the solid sides and ...


4

The weakest part of the design is how your substantial load is being carried to the uprights. There's not that much you can do for those joints as drawn... I'd suggest you add actual 1x2 members beside your existing uprights that will carry the weight of the frame (perimeter) of each shelf. It's easy to build this way, and will look a little less spindly. (...


4

What will the edge look like? It'll look like a sawn face usually looks, based on the wood type (the original cut of the board as well as the species) and the type of saw used. The second point is more involved than it might at first appear. As this is a rip cut a rip saw will make a much cleaner cut than a crosscut or other saw doing the same cut, but ...


3

I was wondering if there is some penetrating finish that will harden up the outside a little bit. "Danish oil" and other mixed oil-and-varnish blends will do this, but you'll only get a modest improvement. One source claims it makes the surface of wood 25 or 30% harder but that has to be either a figure directly from a manufacturer or an estimate of the ...


3

Judging by the pictures and the movie, I'd say the problem is just warping of the pine boards. The fact that the boards are straight at the center (where they are screwed to the vertical legs) and only the edges are bent suggests that. It is possible that the aquarium environment is more humid than the rest of the house, making the warping worse. But this ...


3

this is in response to the question clarified in the OP's comment: it's hard to know what "dressed" means without seeing it, but it most likely means machine planed and/or jointed and/or sanded to size. A very large part of woodworking is about how to create nice looking cut surfaces, so I stand by my statement that this is both a simple and vague ...


3

In short: Yes. But... While glue alone is a perfectly good joint if done properly (you will most likely rather totally anihilate the pine wood than break the glue!) working with "just glue" can be a quite unrewarding experience. For one thing, glue needs to be clamped, and the wood can get quite slippery with glue on it. The idea of clamping 5 straight, ...


3

Wood glue will do just fine. If the surfaces are properly prepared, a glue joint can be stronger than the wood. Depending on what you want to use the tray for, you might want to consider one of the more water-resistant formulations, but even basic wood glue should do the job, since you don't plan to soak this.


3

You can find multiple spindle drill press attachments which may suit your purpose. http://www.hypneumat.com/multi-spindleheads.html More expensive models are adjustable. This page has some adjustable models as well. edit Rather than Forstner bits I would go with auger or spade bits. They will handle the deep cut faster. The trouble is that they have ...


3

You might want to consider non-toxic alternatives: You could use plastic edging, possibly reinforced with stakes. You could choose thin, untreated lumber that you are willing to have rot. This would enrich the soil. Choose thin, narrow lumber, so that it does not leave behind a hole big enough to break someone's ankle. You could place a gravel border. ...


3

Buy pressure treated lumber. It's going to cost more than plain pine, but it will last significantly longer in direct contact with the ground, as that's what it's intended for. There's a reason that every telephone/power pole you see is that dark green color.


3

Now that I've finished sanding, there are quite a few spots that have white splotches from the wood filler That looks like something you get almost always when sanding wood that isn't absolutely perfectly flat — fine sanding dust settled into some minor surface imperfections (they can be incredibly small or shallow and still show this effect). To check if ...


2

A slightly off-topic approach would be looking into CNC automated equipment, especially if the 5000 units are the first of thousands more. It is not my area of expertise but I know small shops use such gear for limited runs. Once set up, you would still need someone to feed the wood and swap bits, but the drilling would be hands off. The overhead is the ...


2

You're kinda fighting a loosing battle. A high grade marine varnish such as Epifanes would do the best in terms of water and UV protection, but I doubt it would give you the look you want. Here's a link to some other alternative marine finishes. http://www.westmarine.com/WestAdvisor/Wood-Finishes


2

Any guesses what caused this 99.9% certain it's glue residue as you already suspected. You can remove excess glue basically at three stages, almost immediately when it's fully liquid, after it has gone off a bit and is sort of rubbery and much later after full hardening. IMO the first and third options are the best, but plenty of people do it the second ...


2

The sagulator calculates a sag of 0.03 in over 24" for a 50 lb uniform load on a single 1x2 of (Ponderosa) pine laying on its face. So your 4-board shelf should be stable given that weight load. A 12" 1x2 on its side can support in excess of 1000 lb, so no worries about the shelf supports breaking, either. Note that, although each shelf could hold the ...


2

It seems like you have 3 questions: Is Ponderosa Pine a good choice? It's not a great choice as the heartwood is rated as moderate to low in decay resistance. It depends on your local climate and how long you reasonably expect it to last without refinishing/coating. However, economics might make it into a better choice for you. It is certainly going to be ...


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