13

I am designing a home theater that will have a small "stage" which will need to have a long (~8ft) piece of wood that is bowed slightly. I want to know what types of wood (e.g. MDF, certain plywoods, ect...) would be suitable for this task as I need to be able to bend the wood to shape. I would say it should be around 6" wide at most. I think MDF or a ...


13

The boards did have 4 smooth surfaces, all perpendicular to each other, and were straight. That was when they came off the mill, though. Since then, they've been exposed to the elements, shipped to the store, handled, etc and nature has taken its course. Each board is different, which is why they all "acclimate" differently. There are three main solutions ...


12

At least in North America I would consider these to be the more common encountered engineered wood products. Note: While some of the pictures are large this is be design so everyone ( Some people are better at seeing than others ) will be able to see the detail. There might be different regional names for these which I can add later assuming they are correct....


11

I do not know what wood is common in Portland. Common woods will differ between locales. If you have lung issues then I would imagine you should't be working unknown woods. If you are fortunate enough to know the wood you are working then I would refer to the Wood-Database as it has an extensive database with details about "Allergies and Toxicities" for ...


11

I assume you're probably more thinking of what is commonly labeled "SPF," which stands for "Spruce/Pine/Fir." Cheap wood used for dimensional lumber; however, pine is a pretty broad category. This Wood Database article handles it well, dividing into "soft pine," and "hard pine." Soft Pine Is very soft with regular grain; it might be good for a beginning ...


11

One website states that hickory and ash are really the only (US domestic) woods worth using. Obviously just one man's opinion and a gross over-simplification. It's also inherently misleading because it's light on detail. In reality while hickory is broadly speaking worthy of its reputation as a premier handle wood it obscures certain facts. The first is if ...


11

Plywood is designed specifically to resist warping and to be stronger than solid wood of the same dimensions due to the properties of lamination. The plywood you want will be labeled as being for "outdoor use," which is treated to be rot resistant. It is easily worked and paintable/sandable. If you want to leave wood exposed rather than painting, then you ...


10

The main concern for outdoor use is usually exposure to moisture and subsequent rot. Woods that are used outside should either have high decay resistance or be well protected from the elements by chemical or physical means. I'll explain: Decay resistance: Cedar, redwood, white oak are a few woods with natural decay resistance that can be exposed to moisture ...


10

The answer depends on which wood species are available to you. With that being said, you can easily calculate it yourself with a formula and the wood database. Theory You can calculate the R value of any specific wood; you need to know the moisture content (MC) and the specific gravity (S). R = 1 / (S * (1.39 + 0.028 * MC) + 0.165) Example Eastern ...


9

I've had a bit of a search and a few different places seem to suggest that Boxwood is the best wood for engraving, however I'm sure that there are a number of viable choices, and certainly for beginners who aren't trying to achieve very fine detail then any wood which will hold a good edge (so most moderately dense hardwoods) should be fine. Birch plywood ...


9

The confusion comes from nominal vs. actual dimensions of dimensional lumber. Typically a solid wood board sold in customary/imperial units is slightly smaller along its thickness and width, the thickness being the smallest dimension. For example, a "2x4" is actually 1.5in x3.5in and a "1x3" is actually 0.75in x 3.5in. To convert from customary units to ...


9

Can low durability be mitigated with specific finishes? Short answer: yes, absolutely. Think of the long service life of softwoods used outdoors when treated with wood preservatives. Is this finishing schedule enough to mitigate the poor durability of a wood like maple? I'd imagine it will make a significant difference. Epoxy is an extremely effective ...


8

Does SPF, in general, have any redeeming qualities besides just being cheap Weight. Fast-growing woods like soft pine, fir, and spruce have densities between about 20 and 30 lbs/ft3. Hard woods like hard maple and oak are upward of 40 lbs/ft3. The combination of strength and light weight makes spruce the standard choice for certain applications. Sitka ...


8

The big box home improvement centers in my area don't stock nice lumber thicker than 3/4". 2x pine lumber, sure, but nothing you'd want to use to make a kids toy that might go in a mouth. I would recommend hard maple for its properties: Dimensionally stable Clear grain (not likely to produce splinters) Takes paint well Check resistant (holds up to being ...


8

Another consideration is the wood's effect on steel. Some woods like oak have acidic tannins in them that stain and promote rust, so oak is rarely used for that reason.


8

If you're looking for weather-resistant and lightweight, you can't do much better than cedar for the wood choice. Cedar also has a good strength-to-weight ratio, making it very sturdy. For thickness, using 2x material (i.e., 2x4, 2x6, 2x8, etc.) is probably ok given your letter sizes. Bear in mind that cedar usually has somewhat of a premium in price over ...


8

Dimensional framing lumber is often referred to as SPF which stands for Spruce, Pine and Fir. You will likely also find cedar and pressure treated lumber in the green or brown variants


7

Actually 2x4's could be perfectly fine for this, depending on what you are actually looking for as an end product. They come in thicker dimensions and are a softer wood. If you are looking to make something more like this Then I'd go with a hard wood. Oak, Maple are both good woods to use. I would look for a species that they have in both regular lumber ...


7

Generally-speaking, you can use whatever type of wood and finish appeal to you. Depending on your application, you may want the door to be either lighter or heavier. If the door is closing off a movie room, you may want a more solid, thicker, heavier door to better absorb and deaden the sound. Of course, if you really want to block sound, you'll probably ...


7

Pine is easy for me to work with, but might be too soft. What wood would be light enough to be very portable, but strong enough to stand the test of time? Also avoiding the most expensive wood. Though pine is soft, it is still a good choice. In The Anarchist's Tool Chest, Chris Schwarz recommends eastern white pine for the carcase construction of the chest....


6

I was going to agree with OSU55 but then I looked and saw Douglas Fir at 660 and people use it as 'hardwood' flooring, granted you put a nice hard finish on it but you don't have to go all the way to epoxy. If it can be a floor, it should be able to be a desk top.


6

Is there a 'hardness limit' to which woods would be appropriate for this? Within reason I don't believe there is. Many picture frames are made of pine of course so anything like a glazing point or finish nail can be pushed or lightly hammered into the surface without difficulty. But even with oak and beech frames points can usually be pushed in using only ...


6

If you're looking for a method to secure the contents of the frame and aren't particularly attached to glazier points, you could try something like a turn button. You can pilot the screw holes to secure the turn buttons, so it shouldn't matter as much if you're working with softwoods or hardwoods. (Image Source)


6

Pau Ferro looks like it is similar to Koa, but I think it will be tough to find a wood that looks exactly like Koa. Also, Pau Ferro is from South America, so it is possible that it would be even harder to source than Koa. The below photo is sealed/finished Pau Ferro; its natural color is a lighter matte, but the grain pattern (save for the amazing ...


6

The other answers are helpful for explaining what types of wood to use for the environment but fail to take into consideration how you are going to construct the letters. The simplest way I can think of would be trace the outlines of the letters onto plywood sheets and cut them out with a jig saw. If you use non-engineered boards of wood, either dimension ...


6

It depends on what you have available for tools. Assuming a minimal set of tools, and limiting myself to commonly available stuff, I'd recommend using 1/4" plywood for the top and bottom of the case, and 1/2" hardwood for the dividers and sides. Baltic Birch plywood would be the best. My Dad made a similar case for me when I was a kid for storing my many ...


6

If dollars is your biggest concern, (and with the cost of some blanks, it should be!) I would recommend firewood. If you have access to a bandsaw then this is doubly easy. The majority of the wood I turn is stuff I've set aside while cutting fire wood. Either as I cut it into chunks or later when I split it in half to dry. If you are an urban dweller, ...


6

15/32 (1/2") construction plywood is really cheap at North American big box retailers. The surface is rough and thus makes the game harder. If you're not into challenge, you can get smooth ply for about double. 2x4s can make the base -- a rectangle for the apron; legs screwed inside that rectangle, and then braced (angle, or another rectangle in the middle) ...


6

I've worked with redwood in the past, and it seems like it would hold up well for the grips both from past experience and from some articles I've found. In woodworking circles you'll generally be told to rely on hardwoods or fruitwoods where you want a tough, resilient handle for something. Certain hardwoods and fruitwoods were the traditional picks for ...


5

Adding to Matt's answer, all sawdust is bad for your lungs. Some is just worse than others. It is the small particles that get in them and cause physical damage, very similar to how asbestos works. After that you get woods that have different chemicals that can cause different reactions. The wood-database does have a list of woods and their 'danger' ...


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