21

Obviously both of those cases are quite severe examples of edge damage, but even for single chips smaller than this re-grinding the bevel manually can be challenging. This level of edge repair is generally considered a job for power grinding. It is possible manually, I've done it entirely by hand on 'rescue chisels' using a combination of diamond plates ...


17

Is there a way to sharpen/restore old files? Yes. The classic old method to sharpen a file is vinegar sharpening which is exactly what the name suggests, soaking the files in vinegar. Now that we know the active ingredient in vinegar is acetic acid we can make the obvious educated guess that it's an etching effect from an acid. And it is known that other ...


15

Your saw may be poorly adjusted. A properly tuned band-saw has the wheel axles exactly parallel and the wheels in the same plane. The axles can be adjusted using the tilt screw on the upper wheel. If that doesn't help than it may be the crown of the wheels is too flat. Put a ruler on the wheel and see if there is enough of a crown left. If not then you ...


10

Yes in this case it could be fixed easily. I disassembled the clamp and found one piece a steel with an obvious mechanical failure: This piece of steel is the one that prevents the clamp from opening, so it makes sense that over time it will bend in this direction. I bent it back to its original shape, and put everything back together; Nothing else was ...


10

You can check out this youtube video. This guy makes some great improvements to the saw but does not include a riving knife in his design. That's very dangerous, but I'm sure it would be helpful as you attempt to refurbish the table-saw. Some improvements that can be made to any table saw to improve its performance: Create a cross-cut sled. As long as the ...


9

This looks to be the shroud the helps direct woodchips out of the exhaust port. My guess is that it either something got caught on it while you fed it through or something hit it from kickback when you were planing. If you're precise enough with a hammer, you should be able to remove the shroud from the planer and beat it back into straightness. Use a ...


8

Is there any good way to recover from this? Or should I give up and order a replacement top? I doubt you'd need to order a replacement top, no matter how bad the rust seems to you compared to the pristine surface around it. People have restored Craigslist finds where the rust was old and far more pervasive than what you're facing...... and the after photos ...


6

You don't indicate what brand of table saw you have, but you might look into a replacement fence to give you more accuracy. The first three examples from a Google search on replacement/replacing fences. Depending on your skills and space, you may also be able to attach some extensions to the table to give yourself some more work room.


6

Yes this should be salvageable, and actually quite easily1. Those heavy patches of rust might look dreadful if you're not used to rusty old tools but planes far rustier than this — completely caked in rust from toe to heel — are regularly turned back into good users. If you were well practised in restoring planes you could probably put this back to work ...


5

To update on what I finally did: I worked up my courage to file the frog and it came out very good! ;-) First I put some washers under the contact areas of the frog on one side to find out how much the difference is. I installed everything with the washers in place and it worked nicely on the first try. I could leave the lateral adjustment lever in the ...


5

I recently made a replacement tote for a hand plane. It wasn't perfect, but here's what I did. The most difficult part for me was drilling a straight hole of the necessary length to accommodate the bolt that goes down the length of the tote. If you have a drill press, this will be easy. If not, make sure you have a long drill bit, and be prepared to ...


5

If it's that damaged, you're looking at removing a lot more metal than normal, creating an entirely new edge. Typically, that means careful work with a grinder (being careful not to overheat the metal), a metal-cutting file, or something similar. Once the tool is returned to the correct shape, you can sharpen it fairly normally -- flatten the back, establish ...


4

I find these clamps to be reasonably unreliable - in my experience they all eventually fail as you describe. One of the causes is that the bar becomes too smooth for the clamp to get sufficient friction. In this case you can try filing/roughing up the bar at the front and back to give it something better to grip on to.


4

Without knowing the exact condition of your handle it's difficult to say for sure how I'd approach this if it was mine, but it's likely I would remove the last traces of the original finish, clean the wood, do any necessary smoothing (file work, scraping and sanding) and then refinish. Obviously with any sort of decoration in the wood this is a clear case ...


4

However, like I mentioned earlier, the break is not complete and I'm sure I could theoretically use it in its damaged state for a while. I can just imagine though it breaking and slicing my hand. I think you're right to be concerned because a hand plane will sometimes be subjected to considerable forces in use (when encountering switching grain or a knot ...


3

You might be able to finish breaking the tote apart and glue or epoxy it back together, but personally I would just replace the tote altogether. There should just be one long screw you can unscrew to remove it. Use the old one as a template for the new one, then discard the old one. If you think the plane has antique value, you can keep the old tote.


3

Not in any particular order: Not enough blade tension Blade alignment incorrect - adjust the wheel angle with the provided knob. The teeth gullets should be in the center of the tire of the adjusting wheel. Blade thrust guide not adjusted properly allowing the blade to be pushed off the wheel. Less than 1/16". Very worn tires


3

You didn't say how much work your lathe has seen, but here's what the user manual has to say about the symptoms you mentioned: Motor or spindle stalls or will not start Excessive cut. Reduce cut depth. Worn motor. Replace motor. Broken belt. Replace belt. Worn spindle bearings. Replace bearings. Improper cooling on motor. Clean sawdust from motor fan. ...


2

You can test the voltage on each leg of the inverter with a multi-meter to confirm your suspicious. Between any two phases you should get the equivalent of the square root of 3 multiplied by the voltage. So if your supply voltage is 120V, you should get ~208V between any two phases. One layer of a printed circuit board is a solder mask (this is what gives ...


2

A dull bandsaw blade will tend to move to the side as well. I've never had it move to the point of falling off but that may be something to look at too.


2

Hopefully the rust has not been developing for too long before discovery. A while ago I discovered some rust on my table top due to a cup of water carelessly left on the the top and knocked over by the cat. I had not been in the shop for several weeks and the water had dried leaving a large rust spot. I used a buffer with a make-shift steel wool pad to ...


2

I was having a hard time visualising things from the photos so I have a frog here in front of me to compare. Unfortunately it isn't helping me figure out what's wrong with your plane! Am doing something wrong or is this a defect of manufacturing? Is that possible or even common for Stanley Bailey planes (of some era)? I think it's a defect in the plane,...


2

To me it looks more like a blacksmithing-related question. One option would be to heat them in order to hammer them to a new blank shape, then to make them cool down in ashes for the metal to be soft. Then to cold-chisel them with the grooves you need. Finally to heat them again for hardening to quench them and to temper them. There is a neat video that ...


2

I've used water displacers like WD-40 (or Jig-A-Loo -- whatever is on sale) to coat saws and such (I'm in SW Ontario, parts of which are basically the middle of a swamp in the summer) with good results. Just a thin coat and rub with a cloth. For longer term storage I've been known to wrap tools in home-made "oil cloth" which is basically a cotton t-shirt ...


2

You can bronze weld it with bronze wire and oxy/acetylene torch, then re-flatten the sole, as SaSSafraS1232 says. I wouldn't try to arc/mig weld it. I was given a No. 51/2 Stanley plane that was bronzed together after it had been broken completely in half across the throat. I spent hours re-flattening the sole and cheeks using sandpaper glued onto a flat ...


2

Brazing is generally considered the standard fix for cracks in the body castings of planes. Cracks in cast iron can also be repaired with the right type of welding, with and without pre-heating2, and also using high-melt solder. There are numerous reasons not to get a plane repaired however, number one of which is that it's not economically viable. This ...


1

As you have returned it so not a lot of point discussing further. But just in case: It could be saved - a careful half an hour with a file might have been enough to square the mouth. Either an angled grind on the blade, or tilting it in the holder, would have given you even protrusion, and thus a consistent shaving thickness?


1

Bandsaw tires are generally sold in 2" increments corresponding to the nominal size of the bandsaw wheels. As the comments indicate, there is some elasticity, so neither the wheels nor tires need to be exact. nominal 14" tires go on nominal 14" wheels.


1

I concur with Jacob Edmond, part# 1310049 is the part you want. There are a limited range of tapers so other chucks will fit. If you look at Jacob's link note the replacement chuck fits 25 other models 1310049 Chuck and Key As for the rusted chuck, heat can break the bonds of rust, as does a good hard wack (but the chuck can be damaged if you go nuts). ...


1

Wow. Thanks to both Graphus and Ashlar, for the reassurance that this could be fixed and wasn't going to be a crisis -- especially to Graphus, for including the citations showing that even resorting to sandpaper wasn't likely to do significant damage. Reassured by that, I'm using something halfway between sandpaper and steel wool: 3M's "stripping pads", ...


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