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11

One website states that hickory and ash are really the only (US domestic) woods worth using. Obviously just one man's opinion and a gross over-simplification. It's also inherently misleading because it's light on detail. In reality while hickory is broadly speaking worthy of its reputation as a premier handle wood it obscures certain facts. The first is if ...


8

I don't know the name of that bit profile but it's possible the cut is done using just a portion of a bit, e.g the highlighted portion here: Source: Rockler tambour bit set. Edit: thanks to the Comment below from Aloysius Defenestrate, the correct bit to use for this is called, obviously enough, a drawer-pull bit. As theorised a portion of the bit is used ...


8

Another consideration is the wood's effect on steel. Some woods like oak have acidic tannins in them that stain and promote rust, so oak is rarely used for that reason.


8

Drill 2 holes (brace and bit if you're being serious about "hand" tools) with a forstner bit (or hole saw), then connect them with a cut using a coping (or jig) saw. Chisel/file/sand as needed. To expand a little... in order to help with tearout, drill from both sides by marking centers on each side and drilling halfway through each. Those look like 1" to 1-...


6

A quick search for lathe turning tool handles presents a number of links but no real results for templates. Making a template is rather straightforward. Create a profile of the handle shape you wish. You can view others' work to determine what looks pleasant and functional and use that as a starting point. Create a pencil sketch on paper to represent the ...


6

With hand tools only, I suppose the way is to use a coping saw. You drill a small hole inside the waste of the handle, and then pass the coping saw's blade through the hole. This will allow you to remove most of the waste. To round the edge of the hole I would use a chisel for the bulk of the removal, and then sand for a comfortable edge.


6

Drill first and pare with a chisel would be the easiest way to remove the most material faster and you would clean up the inside edge with a paring chisel. Using auger bits that are the exact width of you hole you are trying to make, like those you would see on eyed auger or bits with a brace, you can easily remove waste and not have to worry about going "...


5

With some or most axe and hammer heads you have no choice but to make the top portion of the handle a loose fit at the upper edge because of the 3D shape of the eye. And actually what you have there is not too bad at all. Rely on the wooden wedge1 and the metal wedge/wedges2 to spread the wood at the top to completely or nearly completely fill the space and ...


5

I recently made a replacement tote for a hand plane. It wasn't perfect, but here's what I did. The most difficult part for me was drilling a straight hole of the necessary length to accommodate the bolt that goes down the length of the tote. If you have a drill press, this will be easy. If not, make sure you have a long drill bit, and be prepared to ...


4

As an overview: Consider the type of stress the handle will be subjected to. Then the handle's best wood choice will be a function of resistance to the abuse normal use will inflict on it. Chisel handle: resist longitudinal stress from mallet blows. Large crosscut saw handle: resist splitting from blade flexing Axe handle, claw hammer handle: resist ...


4

However, like I mentioned earlier, the break is not complete and I'm sure I could theoretically use it in its damaged state for a while. I can just imagine though it breaking and slicing my hand. I think you're right to be concerned because a hand plane will sometimes be subjected to considerable forces in use (when encountering switching grain or a knot ...


3

I may as well mention the obvious: Don't replace it at all. Since the overall handle is in good shape, and because it is a contoured shape that will be very hard to remove cleanly, you might be better off just repairing the break. You can use the existing extra handle to match the wood, or go through your scrap pile looking for some sort of match (or ...


3

Yes you can do it. No, I would not recommend it. Generally speaking, wood hardness is proportional to density. Aspen is a soft wood, and as you have indicated, it is very light. In an application like this where safety is a concern (you dont want that handle flying off!), I would not use a species as soft as this. In a pinch, I would make it out of aspen and ...


3

You might be able to finish breaking the tote apart and glue or epoxy it back together, but personally I would just replace the tote altogether. There should just be one long screw you can unscrew to remove it. Use the old one as a template for the new one, then discard the old one. If you think the plane has antique value, you can keep the old tote.


2

Personally, I have to stay away from working in hickory(allergy, go figure), so I've experimented with a few other woods. I have really enjoyed the few handles I've made from local maples. It tends to be exceedingly straight and clear grained. Other good choices (and also another bow materials) are lemon wood and yew. Although, be careful with the Yew dust, ...


2

I'm currently working on a cutting board with a rectangular cut out for a handle. I used a jig saw to cutout the handle, and need to sand the edges of the cut. Here's what I would suggest. If you're still not done with the design, I would consider making the ends of the cutout rounded, similar to the image below. If this is not to your taste, please move ...


2

Have you moved up the solvent ladder to lacquer thinner or acetone? That rosewood is oily, and you've likely got to break down that oil to dislodge those particles and dissolve any pigment. Or - just a shot in the dark - maybe a little household bleach, or even oxalic acid (wood bleach, found at Box Stores).


2

In addition to Graphus' great answer, I would add that the completeness of seat around the base is also important for securing the head. It doesn't need to be perfect but contact should be fairly consistent, symmetrical and as close to complete as possible. If there is enough space where the head doesn't contact the wood, it can give enough mechanical room ...


2

If I'm visualising this correctly you're fine, on paper at least, as you'll have long grain running down through the thin strip that remains outside of the hole. But branch wood isn't that predictable and also you say the wood is spalted, which adds some additional uncertainty. I'm afraid this is one of those try it and see propositions.


1

Maybe I missed this in all the back and forth, but I don't see it as impossible to remove the replacement handle by destroying the donor front, and it's not impossible to carefully chisel out the broken handle from the keeper unit. (Having the experience of harvesting the replacement will tell you how much depth of panel you have behind the handle, which ...


1

It's hard to know for sure without more information (and more, specific knowledge of antique Danish furniture, I'm afraid). Considering that it's an antique piece, I'm thinking that the piece is glued in with hide glue. If that's the case, you should be able to apply heat (and a maybe a little moisture) to loosen up the glue enough to pry the pieces out of ...


1

You can prevent this by applying a wash coat of whatever finish you're going to use before you start sanding. The finish will "seal" the pores of the wood. Obviously this won't work if you're sanding to remove material, instead of just for surface prep.


1

Have you tries simply washing the wood with warm water? The water will cause the wood to swell and open it's pores. Then you can scrub the wood with a soft cloth to see what's removed.


1

My recommendation isn't as fancy as the other two, but this is coming from a cheap guy that likes to keep things going without too much work. I would take black electrical tape and wrap the whole grip. It's cheap and will like give you quite a bit of use before it give up the ghost. When the handle does finally break the tape should give you some ...


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