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24

Keyed chucks still get a better grip on any bit. I'm willing to use keyless on my portable drill -- though mine will take a key too, and there are times when I use it. I wouldn't trust keyless on a drill press.


15

As @keshlam pointed out. My drill presses both have keyed chucks and it allows much greater torque to put a stronger clamp on the bit. This is really important for larger bits when you get over 1 1/2" say for keyhole saws or large Forstner bits. There can be a lot of resistance and I don't think most keyless chucks can do the job. Even there I've had a ...


9

In my younger days, I had only this type of drill with which to bore holes. It was often necessary to place the in-line grip on my chest or belt to apply pressure. A board or similar panel provided some dispersal of force against the human body. The side handle served to stabilize the drill and to prevent rotation in an undesirable manner. Addendum: ...


6

Self-tightening keyless chuck have similar clamping capabilities as keyed chucks, but the price premium on those types of chucks are significant. For example from the Jacobs site linked, the cheapest 1/2inch self-tightening keyless chucks are $185. Other than cost, one disadvantage of the keyless self-tightening chucks is that after some extreme high ...


6

This is what the Shopsmith brand tools are known for. They sell tools in a couple of different configurations, such as the Shopsmith Mark V or the Shopsmith Mark 7. Different configurations allow you to set up the tool and use it as a variety of different shop tools, depending on what is supported by the particular model: Table saw Lathe Drill press Disc ...


4

"A" reason is that a drill may not spin its bit nicely and freely once in a material. If the bit "catches" (does not spin nicely and freely), thee entire apparatus will then be the focus of the torque. Whichever of the two, the bit, or the entire-(not itself confronting the material's resistance like the bit does)-apparatus will tend to take the action of ...


4

If you have a plunge router, I'd clamp the wood slice from above with a larger chunk of wood. To help a little with maintaining position, I'd tack two tracks onto your worktop. (Make them shorter than your wood slice, of course. If you're doing more than a couple, I'd screw the larger chunk of wood to the base of the router for perfect alignment. (If that'...


4

As far as the historical side of the question, the two have been in concurrent use for a very long time. Arthur Irving Jacobs invented the keyed drill chuck in 1902 but bit braces and drills were using a form of keyless chuck long before that. The question might just as well have been 'why didn't the keyed chuck replace keyless?' Part of the answer is, like ...


3

My cheapie light-duty drill press, which cost less than a good cordless drill, has not only a keyed chuck but a much larger one at that. The key is scaled up in all ways relative to the hand-drill's. My corded drill also has a keyed chuck just like my father's did 40 years ago. Maybe that's cheaper? Maybe people using a corded drill now are wanting ...


3

If the hole is big enough to fit a bowl gauge in it (for instance, if you're making a cup), you can get a perfectly centered hole by mounting the cylinder to a lathe and turning it like you would turn a bowl.


3

As a general statement, your idea will work - though precision will be dependent on the quality of a) your drill press, b) the bits used, and c) the 'solidity' of your clamped jig, as well as being limited to higher tolerances by the nature of this approach. IF the drill press has little to no play when extended, it will be better suited than a drill press ...


2

Do you have a lathe available? If so, here's my answer from a (similar question) If you have a lathe available (you did mention the spindle being turned already), then you have a great way to drill a hole along the center axis. You use a drill chuck (like this one at Rockler), to hold your drill bit. You chuck the spindle, rotate and move the ...


2

There are multiple ways this can be done. Which one to pick is partly a matter of what method you'd prefer to use (arguably all methods are nearly equally good) as well as what tools you have available. I'll start with the oddball or less-usual methods, just for the purposes of fleshing out the Answer for future readers but I'll end with the method I think ...


2

Either a router or a Forstner (or similar) drill bit are both good ways to make the recesses you want, but in a small piece of wood I think a drill bit is clearly the better option. If you can find a suitable flat bit/spade bit cheaply you might also like to try this proposed modification from a previous Answer. Regardless of the method used to mill the ...


2

Corded drills are good for quick drilling jobs, but they are heavy and require a nearby electrical outlet or extension cord, making them less convenient. My old, cheap corded drill is extremely barebones and lacks a lot of essential features. For example, it does not have a clutch or keyless chuck, and the only speed control is in the trigger. Nicer drills ...


1

Drills operate at a much slower (factor of 10) rotational speed than routers (~28,000 rpm for routers, ~3000 rpm for drill presses; both should be slower for larger bits). It's therefore not possible (or very impractical) to put a router bit in a drill press and do anything substantial with it. You would need a way to make the drill spin much, much faster, ...


1

If you want to create this with the tools you mentioned you'll need a "core box" bit. This is a plunging router bit with a spherical profile. To determine the size we'll need to determine the radius using the formula: r = h/2 + w^2/8h Plugging in h = 1/2 and w = 1 3/4 we get an answer of 1 1/64". Since core box bits are typically sold by diameter you'll ...


1

I concur with Jacob Edmond, part# 1310049 is the part you want. There are a limited range of tapers so other chucks will fit. If you look at Jacob's link note the replacement chuck fits 25 other models 1310049 Chuck and Key As for the rusted chuck, heat can break the bonds of rust, as does a good hard wack (but the chuck can be damaged if you go nuts). ...


1

Using a Forstner or brad point bit or router, you can cut the recess before cutting out your circle and slicing it to 5mm thick. Optionally make a guide and grind off the center spur, if using a Forstner bit. Alternately, drill all the way through, then slice thinner slices and glue each O-shaped slice onto a circle of the same diameter.


1

Since it's a very small piece, you may be able to make a faceplate that fits into your drill press' chuck or improvise something (e.g., with a hole saw) and mount the piece on your drill press to use it like a lathe, but weaker drill presses still may not have enough torque for this to work. Here are a few other options: Mount the piece on a faceplate or ...


1

If there is only ONE workpiece: If you only need to center drill one cylinder, then mark the center, and drill it. How to find the center of a circle If there are multiple workpieces: Yes, your idea will work roughly, however you would be much better off using a v-block to hold the workpieces. The reason for this is that any circular fixture you make ...


1

I've done it as you suggest, and it works. Obviously, the dowel you're drilling has to be fairly short. You also have to make sure it's held securely so it doesn't spin in the wood that's holding it.


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