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13

I think the word 'safe' here might be relative. Just like modern cars are safe, when driven on the road, and obeying traffic laws. I think in this case the answer is a profound NO. Table saws are 'safe' when used for cutting wood that is against the table, and the stop, preferably using push sticks and a riving knife. I see none of those things going on ...


12

Wear safely glasses or a full-face mask every time you turn, no exceptions. Dust mask or respirator advisable normally but essential when sanding. Tie long hair back. No long sleeves. Take off rings, bangles, bracelets or a wristwatch. Consider whether it would be safer to remove any necklace, crucifix or medallion worn around the neck. Remember ...


12

what are live and dead centres? To put it simply a dead center is just that - dead. It has no moving parts. It is really nothing more than a metal shaft with a point. (source: parts-recycling.com) A live center is similar, but the shaft has a bearing that allows it to turn. For example, in my lathe, the tail stock has a Morse taper, in which I put a live ...


10

If you don't have access to a lathe, you can cut a series of wedges with a band saw and/or a table saw. connect them all together in an "almost cone" and sand down the edges until it's fairly conical. The narrower your wedges, the more conical you'll get. The angle for each wedge is easily calculated. Where N is your number of wedges, 360/N gives you the ...


10

I think my biggest concern is that I don't have a good feel for how this system will behave. When I'm about to perform some action with a power tool, it's very deliberate, and I've thought through the type of bad outcomes that might result. For example (not a complete list by any stretch) Table saw: Kick back Miter saw: blade binding Band saw: blade ...


9

I have a relative who uses something akin to a steam box, without the steam, to control the moisture moving out of his green turned pieces. It is like a wooden cabinet lined with plastic, with small adjustable vents like on a cheapo charcoal grill. He allows them to stay relatively moist for a period of weeks, loosly wrapped in plastic sheeting. There is ...


9

I can think of at least two options: use the template on a duplicator use the template to set calipers .... basically what keshlam said. The first if you have a duplicator you can use the template to make the shape. Most of us don't have a duplicator in our arsenal. The other is to use calipers to take measurements at key places. First you take and ...


9

How can I tell if the wood turning chisels are sharp? As with any edged tool you can simply feel the edge (carefully) to check if it's sharp. Almost all traditional woodworking books show a chisel or plane iron's edge being testing with the thumb. However, it can be difficult to judge just how sharp something is by feel — sure it's sharp, but how sharp? — ...


9

That was fast. I broke down and called Jet tech support. The information was not in any of their product information and the support person needed to ask Development. I mentioned that the piece I was wanted to use was between 100-150 lbs. Development said that lathe could handle 200 lbs. easily, he didn't even have to look it up. So 200 lbs. is well ...


8

Just adding to Graphus's excellent answer. The piece of wood is the dangerous part. It is moving up to 4000 rpm depending on settings and lathe. you will want to take small cuts, being too aggressive is dangerous, especially for a new turner. Being too aggressive can either stop the wood, (which isn't good for the lathe) or try and yank the turning ...


8

The faceplate you use screws to secure the piece you are going to turn. some people will glue a waste piece to what they are turning so they don't have to put screw holes in their work piece. A chuck needs something to grip. So you either need to drill/turn one of two things. A tenon for the chuck to clamp down on, or a recess to put the chuck in and ...


8

Well the obvious choice (see my username) would be a lathe. :) Similar to what is done to make fluted columns, you could mount stock between revolving centers and build a trammel to hold a router that makes cuts angled to the stock. e.g. (Except imagine one end of the platform higher than the other to make a cone. Technically, you wouldn't even need ...


7

A morse taper is actually a metal/machining term rather than a woodworking term per se. It refers to a specific way of attaching (typically) a machine's working head to its motorized shaft, that being to have a precisely tapered hole cut into the end of the shaft and a piece of shaft on the head which is ground to a matching taper to exactly fit that hole. ...


7

There are lots of things to look for in a lathe. But you need to figure out your parameters. Size is probably the first and most important consideration. A mini lathe is designed for smaller things, most commonly pens. Granted there are many things you can turn on them, but they have a small turning diameter and generally short beds. There are midi-...


7

It appears his right hand is holding something like a bow which I will assume is what is literally turning the wood. Yes, he's using a bow lathe, a turning method that goes back at least as far as ancient Egypt and still in wide use by craftsmen in the Middle East, as well as in Africa and across Asia. The photo in the Question is a bit murky, easier to ...


6

For turning something like a bowl, a chuck (with a screw center) is a bit more efficient. You can mount the bowl blank with the bottom of the (to be) bowl facing out on a screw held in the chuck, and turn a recess on what will eventually be the foot of the bowl. Once that's done and the outside of the bowl is shaped, you can turn the blank around, remove ...


6

Yes, speed can make a huge difference. My first lathe was a PSI midi-lathe (not mini) and it required stopping the lathe, opening a panel, and switching the belt to another set of pulley's. A pain. However, you need to do it. While it is recommended to have it slower for unbalanced pieces (roughing it to a cylinder), speeding it up will make a lot of ...


6

Template-guided turning requires a jig which holds a tracing tip to follow the template, and a cutting tip that tracks this motion to bring the workpiece into conformance with that shape. It's sorta like pattern-guided routing, except that the wood spins rather than the cutter, and the pattern is farther from the wood to give it room to spin. The other way ...


6

This is what the Shopsmith brand tools are known for. They sell tools in a couple of different configurations, such as the Shopsmith Mark V or the Shopsmith Mark 7. Different configurations allow you to set up the tool and use it as a variety of different shop tools, depending on what is supported by the particular model: Table saw Lathe Drill press Disc ...


5

am I missing something when I go from roughing all the way to final sanding/polish using only the slowest speed? Try increasing the speed and see for yourself. You could even just pay attention to the difference between working at the perimeter of a large piece compared to working at the center -- the linear speed will be 5x greater at the edge of a 10" ...


5

I assume you are talking about using a wood turning lathe and you have mounted the work on the headstock and have the bit mounted in the tailstock. Getting everything lined up on a wood turning lathe will be difficult. They are not made for boring. I would recommend using a drill press instead. If you are making through holes there is no reason to be using ...


5

Hardness and sharpness are two distinct attributes that can be applied to these devices and/or materials. The instrument maker is off-base if he considers that sharpness is not important or a factor to be considered when dealing with steel cutting tools. Certainly hardness is important. A soft steel cutter will possibly cut if suitably sharp, but will not ...


4

A similar method to Daniel B.'s would be the common scroll saw method for making stacked cones. This could be adapted to a band saw with a sufficiently narrow blade. Tilt your saw's table to the angle complementary to the desired angle of your cone (e.g. 30° if you want a 60° slope). Make a zero-radius circular cut (i.e. rotate around a fixed point) ...


4

The video (and details from the comments and video itself) make a great case study. Wet wood can be inherently unstable as it may have uneven mass distribution, integral stresses that are unbalanced and a myriad of other factors. Think about how when a piece of wood bows/warps/twists as it dries. That is the wood exhibiting and forming to its inherent ...


4

You can try making a paste of wood glue and sawdust to full the grain. This website, along with the glue bottle, cites that Titebond III is food-safe, so it should work for your purposes.


4

To add to the previous points: Just as taking light cuts is wise, reducing lathe speed is wise until confidence is gained with a given tool. Catches are much less severe with lighter cuts and slower speeds. A very good acronym for lathe tool handling: ABC’S OF WOODTURNING A is for anchor-put the tool on the tool rest B is for bevel- rest the bevel of the ...


4

I have the same lathe. I don't know how the previous owner changed speeds, as it was screwed to the workbench. When I got it home, I built a stand for it. I mounted the motor on a 2x6, which i fastened to the stand with a hinge. On the other side, I cut a slot to fit over a bolt that sticks out of the stand. So, when I need to change the speed, I just loosen ...


4

Shopsmith (http://www.shopsmith.com/) is one that comes to mind. http://www.stillmadeinusa.com/tools.html#Woodworking may have others.


4

A Morse taper (MT) drill chuck arbor like this has two tapers; one is the Morse taper, and the other is the chuck taper, generally a Jacobs taper (JT). It looks like you have two problems. The Jacobs taper doesn't appear to be seating correctly, which likely means it's the wrong JT size for that chuck. Perhaps the chuck is a JT33 and the arbor is JT3. These ...


3

The information you seek can be found here. I've pasted a screenshot below for completeness.


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