6

You can make the bulk of the ZCI thicker for rigidity, then rabbet the edges and recess the other interference points to fit. If the existing throat plate was plastic and it was starting to bow, I wouldn't consider a wooden replacement any more dangerous. A better alternative to wood would be UHMW plastic; otherwise metal would also be rigid enough. For a ...


5

The main issue with this splitter is like any other splitter - it has a fixed distance from the table. Since the saw blade is raised or lowered depending on what is being cut, the distance between the spiltter and blade will decrease or increase. Since the safest splitter is one that is closest to the blade as possible, when making shallow cuts this splitter ...


4

I'd really worry about the oak splitter itself splitting along the grain. Imagine that leading edge catching on the wood, breaking, and jamming into the kerf. Could get entertaining. If you like the design, I'd switch to using model aircraft plywood. You can get very thin sheets that still have multiple layers. You don't need three-ply 1/64" plywood (!), ...


2

Another solution, for some cuts at least, is a crosscut sled; that can act as a moving near-zero-clearance plate. Here's a picture of one:


1

Caveat: "I know nothing! Nothing!" I'm far from a sophisticated user of table saws, and paranoid enough that I paid the extra for a saw with "airbags" despite knowing that most table saw injuries happen to pros who have started taking the beast for granted. Having said that... There are certainly aftermarket splitters, which presumably use some concept of ...


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