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What are the pros and cons of MDF as a workbench top? Pros: Relatively cheap. Is already a flat sheet ready to use as a work surface, saving much time and effort. Fairly flat to dead flat right from the start, but, needs good support to stay that way — MDF, like chipboard/particleboard, can sag under its own weight if only supported near the ends. Although ...


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Sounds like it would work fine to me. My first bench was two sheets of 3/4 MDF laminated together and I had no major issues with it. I used it for years and made quite a few projects that I was proud of on it. There's really only two very minor things that I ran into. When you're drilling the dog holes the center spurs on forstner bits tend to not like MDF. ...


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Joint the board in sections and iterate through Left, middle, right side until reasonable jointed Yes. but there is a risk that each section is not parallel. Check often, adjust as necessary. This is basically similar to the problem of how you face anything that is wider than the plane (a somewhat-common occurrence LOL). Because shavings can be on the ...


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There is more than one way to avoid tear out. You can drill a small pilot hole all the way through then use your forstner bit to drill from both sides meeting somewhere in the middle. I would choose this method over a router. Another way is to attach a piece of scrap wood to the bottom of bench where the hole will be drilled so when the drill bit is exiting ...


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How not plumb are they? And in what direction? Even if the router works fine your holes will be sort of oval shaped at the bottom which might make your dogs waggle around annoyingly in use. Personally I would glue 19mm dowels into your bad holes. You might want to drill a small hole all the way through first to let the glue escape and avoid hydraulic lock. ...


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Alternative recommendation for smoothing without the need for planing stop: a cabinet scraper (card scraper) The other answers look to the work holding issue very well, and can definitely be used with a smoother plane. However, if you are only looking to smoothen, then I recommend an alternative to the plane: a trusty cabinet scraper. Since it is easier to ...


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For the bottom, you may want to look into a spar varnish or even a spar urethane if that is an option (some people just don't like urethane for whatever reason). These types of finishes were originally used in the marine finishing world. Really anything designed for marine use would work, but epoxies and the like can get pricey. I like Minwax's Helmsman ...


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The only reason to not do this is that the surface skin may not significant amounts of abuse before it's too torn up to be usable. If you need a bench top that can take some abuse, the door will work as an excellent base for your bench top. Frame it in 2x4 (you may need a center rib, too - that will be best determined through experience), then add a top ...


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Hollow-core doors would not make a very good workbench top. The surface layer is very thin, either 1/8" material like a soft skin Masonite material. Very easy to drive your fist through it. Would not take hammer blows, pounding, etc. I did purchase two hollow-core doors to lay on portable saw horses. I can lay plywood on the doors and use the gap between ...


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