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The "brad" on a brad-point bit is the center point. It bites into the wood easily and helps to keep the bit from wandering when you start your hole. The "lip" is the outer edge of the bit, which protrudes a bit to slice the wood fibers at the edge of the hole so that you end up with a very clean hole. Personally, I think of lipped bits as ...


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In the absence of clarification from the OP I'll Answer this with a given set of assumptions. The basic answer here is pocket-hole screws, and by a pretty large margin. It's not simply that the screws themselves are so much more secure than a steel rod of some kind intersecting with a cam1, it's that pocket-hole screws tend not to be used in isolation. The ...


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I ended up using wood glue, the existing screw, and a 6" mending plate across the bottom face of the broken member. The first task was to clean the old glue from the cut face next to the break, which I did using a 1/4" hand chisel and flat rasp. Here is an image before cleaning: Because the overall strength of the repaired member will be ...


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Epoxy is really an entire class of materials — there are lots of different types with different properties. If you can’t find information about the thermal resistance of the product you plan to use, you may need to test it yourself. You could coat a create some test samples by coating pieces of wood and then immersing them in boiling water for different ...


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Is there a way to stop wood from expanding and/or contracting? The main reason that wood changes dimensions is changes in moisture content; generally, it expands a bit in directions perpendicular to the grain direction in more humid summer months and contracts a bit in the same directions in the dryer winter months. There’s very little change in the ...


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