16

If nothing else The Wood Database exists solely for this purpose and has a great deal of information about all its woods in its database. The database contains picutres of all its known woods and details where known. For aiding in identification, most woods will have published at least the following characteristics. Common Name: e.g Marblewood. Yes in many ...


13

White wood is the cheap, crappy wood available at home centers, and will vary by region. Here in Arizona, it's white pine.


10

I suspect it is any cheap tree that is fairly white. 'White wood' is not a species. It is likely pine, but in theory could be balsam or aspen or a bunch of others. I did a little looking and it mostly confirmed that. It can be any of a number of species that all are fairly 'white' with little strong grain showing.


8

That's a deliberate misuse of the poor tulip tree's name. White wood is Liriodendron tulipifera, a rather valuable hardwood (which funnily is not white at all). Insofar, calling the inexepensive soft wood "white wood" is somewhat misleading. Nevertheless, in practice, home improvement centers will sell anything from spruce, fir, or pine to "coniferous ...


7

A large part is experience and comparison to known species. It gets easier if you can narrow it down to possible woods. However, pallets can literally be anything that made a board big enough. The Wood Database is one place trying to put together a list of attributes from all known woods. I think there are several others too, but some (all?) want a little ...


6

In Canada anyways, you would also see it referred to as SPF - Spruce, Pine, Fir which is used as dimensional framing lumber.


6

"White wood" is not a specific species, rather it is whatever is available locally and inexpensive. Typically it will be pine, doug fir, spruce, etc. It should work fine. If you're doing complex molding profiles you might consider using poplar. It tends to work better, holds fine details well, and shows less grain through paint.


6

I suspect oak, ash, or some type of cedar. I believe it will always have been ash. European ash, Fraxinus excelsior, is one of the traditional coachbuilders' woods, valued for its strength and shock-absorbing properties as well as its ability to take bends well. It's still used today for major structural elements in Morgans: From what I understand ...


6

You can bend most woods, some easier than others, but even the easier ones to work with can fail. Oak is one of the more common wood to use when bending so I would recommend that. I would strongly advise against using pine or any non-hardwood though. You definitely don't want to restore a car with softwood. There are three main methods for bending wood: ...


6

What is the best wood species for direct soil contact? The Forrest Products Laboratory has a lot of information on wood durability. Here is a chart from one of their reports titled "Above and in-Ground Performance of Naturally Durable Woods in Wisconsin" Based on this data Eastern Red Cedar is a winner. By way of comparison to treated lumber here is a ...


4

There are a few ways that wood ages when exposed to the elements and light. How the wood looks as it ages is dependent on a number of factors: type of elements, amount and type of light, where the wood is harvested from (i.e., closer to the bark or heartwood), how it is finished, etc. All of these and more will affect the look of the material over time. And,...


4

Bruce Hoadley, "Identifying Wood: Accurate Results With Simple Tools" is my go-to when you just have a hunk of wood. However, your tree has neighbors with leaves/needles... it's very unlikely that it's the only one of its species in the area. I'm going to go out on a limb (* see what I did there?) and say that you've got some sort of spruce/pine/fir.


4

The image you have came from the Field Museum obviously. In trying to look for plans or a source as to what the floor was made of I found a "case study" from the manufacturer that talks about the wood used in the exhibit. The quote from the site reads like an ad but it does talk about the flooring specifically used. The exhibit also features PlybooStrand (...


3

The meaning of "white wood" or "whitewood" may vary by region. In the UK, for example, it usually means timber primarily intended for "first-fix" use where it will not be visible when the work is completed. The species probably depends on what is available in the region but can include Spruce, Douglas Fir, Pine and so on. Spruce seems to be most common in ...


3

Apparently it is a not a hard wood, but a synthetic bamboo plywood. The manufacturer, Intectural, describes it as: PlybooStrand uses strand technology to turn 100% rapidly renewable bamboo into a beautiful yet exceptionally durable green building material for both commercial and residential use. Strand differs from typical bamboo material in that ...


2

If anyone is interested, I've experimented a bit and learned a little about the difference between conventional molding and wood boards. First, I found that Home Depot has finger-jointed primed pine lumber like 1x3 1x4, etc that is very much like pre-made molding. With a router, it's easy to round over the corners, and cut a shallow channel on the back to ...


2

There is a fast growing pine species called radiata pine that is grown in New Zealand that Home Depot sells. They sometimes mislabel it white pine but it not eastern white pine. Now they call it white wood.


2

Bruce Hoadley's Identifying Wood makes it much more of a Science than a guessing game. In fact, what Hoadley and other folks do with identification of wood species is admissible in court. FWIW.


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