6

Frankly, that post looks like it has served its days. I would replace it. However, to try and extend its life, I think the simplest solution would be to drill out the existing holes, glue in dowels and re-drill to accept the screws. Use an exterior grade wood glue (such as Titebond III) or even construction adhesive (like Liquid Nails or PL-Premium). Note ...


5

While it alters the height of the back, a reasonably simple repair would be to cut new tenons on the existing spindles. Commercial tenon cutters exist (for instance, see Lee Valley), but they're an expensive proposition for a one-off repair like this. A bit of work with a knife and a rasp should get you pretty close to a fit. A bit of sanding and you should ...


5

It looks to be some sort of fabric or material that has long since hardened. Check the chair for markings that could tell you who manufactured the chair. That could help you find other examples that in turn might help you figure out what the groove was for. There were probably a lot of companies that made chairs like yours a century or more ago. Two that ...


3

I ended up using wood glue, the existing screw, and a 6" mending plate across the bottom face of the broken member. The first task was to clean the old glue from the cut face next to the break, which I did using a 1/4" hand chisel and flat rasp. Here is an image before cleaning: Because the overall strength of the repaired member will be ...


3

I may as well mention the obvious: Don't replace it at all. Since the overall handle is in good shape, and because it is a contoured shape that will be very hard to remove cleanly, you might be better off just repairing the break. You can use the existing extra handle to match the wood, or go through your scrap pile looking for some sort of match (or ...


2

If it was me, I'd dunk it in some paint stripper (or brush the stripper on) to rid it of that green color* then repaint it to match the room I was going to put it in. My Mother-in-Law would hang me for that, though, as she loves green of all shades, so that may not be your course of action. If you're not going to strip it, a good dish-soap and water ...


2

Instead of trying to fix the existing holes: Move the bracket 6 inches1 left or right, screwing into fresh particle board, leaving the old holes as lost. Consider using threaded inserts as described in Fred's answer specifically designed for use in particle board, then replace the wood screws with appropriate machine screws. Don't try to put a new pair of ...


2

You should be able to make a long-lasting, possibly permanent, repair to this using filled epoxy. As outlined in previous Answers, you can mix epoxy with nearly any dust to make it a thicker and ultimately stronger material (as well as to modify its working characteristics, e.g. with the addition of talc to improve sandability). Normally when filling epoxy ...


2

Drill out the blown out screw holes with a 3/8ths drill bit. Use wood glue to glue in some short pieces of 3/8ths dowels. Use a flush cut saw or oscillating saw to cut off the excess dowel and sand smooth. Now you can drill new pilot holes for your screws


2

One option you have is to drill out a suitably sized hole for a threaded insert. The above image is from Amazon, but many sources will have this type or similar inserts. You'd have to switch your screws to machine screws and ensure to match the insert to the desired thread size.


2

Since this is an end-grain board filling the holes by glueing in dowels seems the ideal fix. But you could fill with a mix of sawdust (sanding dust) and glue and get a somewhat similar look. The reason that sawdust + glue mixtures are frequently not recommended is because they end up so dark compared to the surrounding wood. And that's because such filler ...


2

Given your lack of tooling I think the only reasonable way to address this is to flood the affected joints with epoxy. (Funny how many of my answers seem to be this solution lately.) First, get some high-quality 2-part epoxy. Personally I like the West and Entropy brands, but I'm sure there are others that are just fine. You'll also need a "filler&...


2

If these have sentimental or monetary value they could probably do with professional attention as they're likely to need a multi-level intervention, including but not limited to removing the linseed oil, re-gluing certain pieces and some level of refinishing, possibly a complete refinish. While we could actually help with all of the above steps I think it ...


2

I'll collate the info from the Comments above into an Answer on what's causing this and what to do moving forward. What is causing all these cracks and is it likely to happen more? These look like classic, textbook in fact, drying cracks. As they've occurred after the wood was supposedly dried it seems likely it was poorly done, either too quickly (leaves ...


1

First question is about the glue. The existing pieces feature glued end grain; would using epoxy provide more hold than wood glue? No. BTW do realise this is not merely two end-grain surfaces glued together (the weakest glue joint). It's an end grain | long grain joint which is not as weak as often supposed..... assuming it is done well. Just to mention, ...


1

I think you're on the right track with using dowels to reinforce the joints, but I'd go further and use steel rods. Cut the styles and spindles at the paint line, and then drill them to receive steel rods. You could use 1/4" rod for the spindles and 3/8" or 1/2" rod for the stiles. I'd drill deep into the stiles, maybe 4" or 5", and ...


1

Second mistake: I didn't apply the varnish on the bottom side of the table with as much vigor as the top side. Not a mistake. Despite the conventional 'wisdom' of modern woodworkers that both sides of a tabletop need to be finished (and some sources are very definite that it's finished equally) this is actually not necessary1. Can this table top be ...


1

You've got hydraulic jacks - even cheap ones will lift 2", so lift height isn't critical, so don't try to put your 4x4 vertically - that could be wobbly as it moves during the lift, and it concentrates all the lift force at one point on your structure. Lay 2 4x4s down sideways so that they cross all the 2x12s near each end. Leave clearance for the ...


1

What would be the best way to go about the first of these options? Preparation: Remove all glue, glazing compound and and spline pieces to be replaced. Splines: It looks like the existing splines have been damaged and you may have to replace some or all of them. There is no need to replace them if they are intact. I cannot tell for which direction the ...


1

Maybe I missed this in all the back and forth, but I don't see it as impossible to remove the replacement handle by destroying the donor front, and it's not impossible to carefully chisel out the broken handle from the keeper unit. (Having the experience of harvesting the replacement will tell you how much depth of panel you have behind the handle, which ...


1

It's hard to know for sure without more information (and more, specific knowledge of antique Danish furniture, I'm afraid). Considering that it's an antique piece, I'm thinking that the piece is glued in with hide glue. If that's the case, you should be able to apply heat (and a maybe a little moisture) to loosen up the glue enough to pry the pieces out of ...


1

When I put the piece back in the hole I cut, what do I use to re-attach it so it stays stable? (so it won't fall back or forward out of the hole.) Glue tabs on to the back side of the hole, then glue the cutout to them once the glue used has had a chance to cure. You can probably just use superglue/CA to attach these tabs as they don't have to take much ...


1

Light sanding (320) cleaned up my mess quickly. Surprised that wiping with mineral spirits didn't work. I did notice that areas of wood exposed to the wet slurry (next to epoxy) did show filling of wood pores, but I don't think that's a problem in my case--just not that noticeable. I don't know anything about snakewood, but I'm guessing that the wet slurry ...


1

The material you selected for the top coat is only water-resistant,i.e., not water-proof nor for use for continuous exposed in an area exposed to the weather year round. In your initial questions that you provided links to; correct answers were provided for "water proof" finishes for exposures to weather year round. You could refinished the damage area, ...


1

I'm by no means an expert but did a very similar project recently, so here's my thoughts/suggestions: Will filling cracks with resin visually add or detract? Obviously a matter of taste, but the appearance of cracks is heavily affected by the finish you choose. I found that unfilled cracks can be made more obvious when applying a finish that sits above the ...


1

Seconding the suggestion to use epoxy. That crack is an interesting one though because it goes through the nonflat surface of the live edge, so its a bit challenging to make a mould to stop the epoxy from leaking out. My suggestion would be to build a mould that holds the slab on its side (with the live edge on the top), and pour the epoxy in from the live ...


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