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This is actually a pretty common technique when making panels from smaller pieces, or it certainly was in the past. As you have discovered, it makes for nice contrast. Mechanically it is just as strong as any other panel you might make, allowing for careful jointing and glue-up. With today's excellent glues and correct clamping a panel like this is as good ...


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TL;DR: It depends, but generally we can ignore longitudinal movement. The idea is that compared with the movement across the grain movement along the grain is much smaller, and is often negligible for the purposes of planning for that movement in a build. This is especially true at the scales woodworkers work with. I'm sure examples of longitudinal movement ...


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