3

TL;DR: It depends, but generally we can ignore longitudinal movement. The idea is that compared with the movement across the grain movement along the grain is much smaller, and is often negligible for the purposes of planning for that movement in a build. This is especially true at the scales woodworkers work with. I'm sure examples of longitudinal movement ...


3

This is actually a pretty common technique when making panels from smaller pieces, or it certainly was in the past. As you have discovered, it makes for nice contrast. Mechanically it is just as strong as any other panel you might make, allowing for careful jointing and glue-up. With today's excellent glues and correct clamping a panel like this is as good ...


3

The theoretical predictions for equilibrium MC are approximations from empirical research done in the 40s. All well and good and they predict the MC of wood when left long enough at the stated temperature and humidity. What is long enough? As a few have alluded to it takes significant time in a kiln or in the open air for drying to occur. One will never ...


2

It's not so much wood contracting in the cold, as wood contracting when it loses moisture. Depending on where you are, summer is probably more humid than winter. I'd hit it with a bit of spackle and repaint. If you want less of this in the future, glue the joints thoroughly and backprime the trim. (Backpriming slows moisture loss/gain.) Some people will even ...


1

As long as the holes in the metal bars are larger than the width of the screws, it will be fine. 5mm play or more should be enough. Over time, you can re-tighten the screws if the wood movement is an issue.


1

When you built this did you layout the bench frame on a flat surface? It appears like the lumber you used for the top frame is twisted or bowed or both and if that is the case you will need to disassemble and rebuild ensuring the bench frame is square in and flat. Barring that the only other possible way to fix this but it is not the best thing would be to ...


1

Also, what could I have done to prevent this in the first place? Don't use mitre joints. I love mitre joints as much as anyone, but one has to be aware of why those mitre joints fail. When you built those frames you were undoubtedly careful to cut perfect 45 degree angles, proudly fit two pieces together and checked their fit with a square and proudly ...


1

This design can work, but you can expect a huge amount of wood expansion once you fill it with dirt and water the plants. I made a planter just like this. I allowed for 4 inches of expansion, and still had to remove one of the strips and rip off ~2 inches due to expansion from watering. If you really want to moisture proof this design, cut the panels like ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible