16

If nothing else The Wood Database exists solely for this purpose and has a great deal of information about all its woods in its database. The database contains picutres of all its known woods and details where known. For aiding in identification, most woods will have published at least the following characteristics. Common Name: e.g Marblewood. Yes in many ...


15

Hardwood is usually from a deciduous tree and softwood is usually from a coniferous one. Hardwoods typically have a higher density (hence hardwood). Seriously? For the most part that is the general accepted (although broad) definition and yes there are several exceptions. Little more than that please Much like identifying wood species; determining if a ...


14

This is called a butcher block. It comes in two types - edge grain (like in the Norden tables), where the surface shows the edge (long) grain of the pieces of wood: And end grain, where the surface shows the end grain of the pieces of wood: Butcher block is made from small pieces, which are glued together. Since wood glue is stronger than the wood it binds,...


7

A large part is experience and comparison to known species. It gets easier if you can narrow it down to possible woods. However, pallets can literally be anything that made a board big enough. The Wood Database is one place trying to put together a list of attributes from all known woods. I think there are several others too, but some (all?) want a little ...


6

Look underneath the table, where all the sins are hidden. You are looking for how the dimensioned pieces are put together, and where unfinished edges will show you if this is a veneer or not. A fair amount of modern furniture will use "real" wood (usually imported "hard" softwoods) for the carcase or frame. Larger, more decorative pieces like table tops ...


3

One thing to watch out for: butcher-block veneers, and plastic laminates with this pattern printed into them, also exist. Of course these have very different durability characteristics than real butcher-block. Ikea is somewhat notorious for veneer-over-MDF construction; I would hope they were clear about what you're buying but you may want to ask Similarly, ...


2

There are 4-5 knots on this as you can see in the photo. How do they affect the integrity of the wood? It's hard to do more than guess at this without seeing the wood in the flesh and handling it, so no warranty with this but there's a reasonable chance you have nothing to worry about. Will this reduce the strength of the hiking stick that will be ...


2

As Ashlar commented it is very difficult to identify the tree species solely from the picture. If you were able to get more pictures of the tree itself or the leaves it produces that could help greatly in identifying it, but if I had to make a guess after a little research of New England region hardwoods here, I would guess it is from an alder or maple ...


2

Bruce Hoadley's Identifying Wood makes it much more of a Science than a guessing game. In fact, what Hoadley and other folks do with identification of wood species is admissible in court. FWIW.


2

Chances are that you have a red oak board. Red oak is notoriously smelly, described variously as resembling vomit, poop, silage, fermentation - you get the drift. It is widely known as piss-oak because of its extreme smell. I recently had a red oak experience and considered submitting a question about it. In my case I was using well aged oak (a curbside ...


1

As shown on the picture: the flats in the lower area look like what you get when you whittle with (probably) a knife. I would imagine the whole thing was shaped with a knife before the smoother top area was hand-sanded. If the bark was removed when the wood was green the maker probably just scraped it off with the backside of a knife. I think this is most ...


1

Depending what you mean by "smooth" for the seedpods, sycamore is my best guess, though the bark is not nearly as classically peely as is typical. But the leaf is a dead ringer, and it's sure not tuliptree. Sycamore Platanus occidentalis: Tulip Poplar, AKA tuliptree Liriodendron tulipifera:


1

Can't be sure without a picture, but sounds a bit like poplar


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