Hot answers tagged

4

TL;DR: Wood Never Sleeps. Wood is a natural product, with natural variation across species and individuals. Not only that, but how timber is grown and processed into dimension lumber also varies. And then that dimension lumber is subject to environmental changes over time (both before and after it is turned into a project) that causes it to move. The why of ...


2

Rather than keep trying I plan to re-cut the piece. I'm glad that's an option for you as it's generally the best course of action in such a situation. Although sometimes one can remove warp successfully there's no guarantee it won't try to return. Anyone have any suggestions on how I can keep it from developing another twist as the wood dries out after ...


1

You don't mention the rough dimensions of the piece, or whether it is hard or soft or in-between. It's possible, of course. This was how wood was brought into the shop and then resawn or already rough sawn. There is a whole practice of preparing stock for actual use with hand tools. As you've noticed, sandpaper is not the right tool. Sandpaper isn't for ...


1

What causes this cupping? This is a little more complex than just about moisture loss and gain, it's to do with long-term changes in wood as these effects take place. What in essence makes a tabletop (as well as deck boards incidentally) cup in this way is compression set. The wood on top gets wet/wetter and tries to expand, as wood naturally does when it ...


1

Second mistake: I didn't apply the varnish on the bottom side of the table with as much vigor as the top side. Not a mistake. Despite the conventional 'wisdom' of modern woodworkers that both sides of a tabletop need to be finished (and some sources are very definite that it's finished equally) this is actually not necessary1. Can this table top be ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible