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25

Some things to consider: Score the cut line with a sharp razor blade. This cuts the veneer and helps reduce chipping. Run tape across the cut line in order to support the veneer and reduced chipping from tear out. Use a clean blade that's designed specifically for cutting veneers Make sure there is adequate support all the way around for the material being ...


19

You may be able to avoid chip-out by using a sacrificial board atop of the countertop. Set your depth to cut through the sacrificial board, make sure it is clamped down tight and give it a whirl. Oftentimes reducing chipout is best accomplished by not giving the wood any direction to chip (e.g., a strongly sandwiched surface)


14

Don't make marks where they will show up on the finished piece in the first place. Prefer marking in places so the mark will be on the inside or use masking tape to hold the identifying marks.


9

It wasn't until I noticed that my once tight-fitting dados were now loose that I realized that I almost sanded through the top layer of the plywood in my efforts to remove the marks. You're not the first person to do something like this striving to erase layout marks or notes from wood by sanding and you won't be the last. It's the kind of thing that ...


7

The two suggestions, for the crayons, that I have heard of are: Light planing where the marks are. It has the advantage of targeting where the marks so that you are not actually removing the wood at all. Just the crayon that is sitting above the wood. This should not damage the blade. I read the question again and this might not be an ideal solution for ...


7

@Peter Grace provided an excellent suggestion of placing a sacrificial board atop the countertop. An alternative solution is to mount an auxiliary zero-clearance shoe onto your circular saw shoe. Fashion it out of a thin piece of plywood, rout it to match the existing shoe profile, and plunge cut through it so the opening is just the width of the blade. ...


7

With a handsaw, one trick is to score through the veneer with a straightedge and sharp knife. Then use a finely-toothed blade, and let the blade do the work rather than trying to force it into the wood --always good practice, but especially in this situation. You may want to experiment with cutting angles, to cut less perpendicularly to the veneer surface. ...


6

A band saw is fine. I would recommend that you avoid low tooth counts such as 3 tpi (teeth per inch) and opt for a smaller/denser tooth blade. Don't get to aggressive, instead feed it through slowly to get a cleaner cut line. In gluing up veneer always keep things symmetrical front to back (including thicknesses of the layers), alternating directions ...


6

It depends on your goal. The "right" way to fix it would be to strip the old damaged veneer and re-veneer the piece. If it isn't a valuable piece and you don't want to remove and redo the veneer, there are a couple potential options depending on the type and amount of damage. veneer is worn through somewhere in the middle: carve out the defect and inlay a ...


4

Older tables usually mean hide glue. Hide glue releases pretty well with warmth and a little moisture. I've used an clothes iron (steal one from the house) and a moist thin cloth towel. Work a small 8-10 square. Get it lifted off the surface by inserting a putty knife or a small flat metal spatula, work well to loosen things - insert waxed paper or ...


4

I've been advised to use a piece of glass and scrape it off, Glass can make a very effective scraper but not for this type of thing. I think it could pose a very real danger to the user. When scraping off something that is firmly adhered to a surface it is quite common for the tool to 'stall', come to a sudden halt, because it meets a great-than-average ...


4

In order that I try them, I always try the following to remove scuffs, pencil marks, and/or gunk that I get on things as I'm building: denatured alcohol mineral spirits lacquer thinner acetone turpentine Oh, another thing that I've used on particularly stubborn marks? And no, this isn't a product endorsement, and don't laugh.. Mr. Clean Magic Eraser. ...


3

This looks like plywood to me. It's pretty hard to tell without a better photo, but here's what I'm seeing... The panel on the left of the photo appears to be three bookmatched sections, but I can't quite tell if they're close enough to be veneers. The front edge of that panel appears to be edge banding, but without a higher resolution image or a shot from ...


3

I am concerned that if I lever them off I will either snap the cast metal or damage the veneer. This is a valid concern and honestly I don't know the best course of action here. To help put your mind at rest about part of it though: since you're planning on painting that means you can fill any defects in the surface that might be created without them ...


3

Tidiest route would be to replace the entire top, or even just to fill the holes and layer another section of ply on top of the entire piece, and then round over the edges to make it look as part of the original. Without replacing the entire top I think it would be hard to hide this repair completely, but if you're happy to see some glue lines.... ......


2

I would try an iron as well. In addition, you can just use a scraper and sand off the glue when you are finished.


2

Well, plywood is made of layers of veneir and furniture-quality plywood has one or both outer faces veneered with something prettier than the core. You could cutting/staining/gluing pieces of veneir to bring the low spots back up to roughly level with the rest of the table surface with a less-than-awful color match... Or you could fill it with colored ...


2

I'm fairly sure it would be fine to use a band saw, right? Yes it's fine to use a bandsaw for cutting your homemade plywood, just as with commercial plywood. There are a few things you can do to help get the cleanest cuts, regardless of the type of blade fitted. The first is perhaps obvious and that's to have the good face of your material facing upwards ...


2

How to tell what type of finish you have: Fortunately, you have some flakes. The finish is water damaged...that's why its lifting. Drop some of the flakes into a glass jar of denatured alcohol.....if they dissolve, you have a shellac finish. If not...put a few flakes into some lacquer thinner....if they dissolve, you have nitro or acrylic lacquer. These ...


1

I reached out to a friend-of-a-friend who does parquetry. He suggested applying heat with an iron to try smoothen the ends out. It was relatively successful in that the crack is no longer sticking up, however there is still a visible line where the crack is. I’m going to try fill/sand this and hope it doesn’t stand out too noticeably when polished.


1

A neat trick for lifting veneer; even bubbles in the center: Using an artists brush, swab wood glue under the lifted area, making sure you get glue on both the lift and the substrate. Wipe away the excess and let it dry (I know... but read on). Now, go "borrow" the electric clothes iron from the laundry room and plug it in and set on medium. Obviously, if ...


1

You can certainly use a roller to apply contact cement, but often this is done using a solid roller (usually a hard rubbery material of some kind), not a foam or short-nap roller because of the difficulty or impossibility of removing the residue of the adhesive from a paint roller. Note there are various types of contact cement however, some are waterbased ...


1

Typically that yellow hue is associated with an oil finish, such as boiled linseed oil or tung oil. However, since the material you have already seems to have a film finish on it you will not be able to apply an oil finish. I would recommend trying an oil-based polyurethane or an amber shellac. They should both impart some color. The shellac will be more ...


1

Your first picture looks more like a stack of lumber than sheets of veneer. If the veneer has actually warped that much due to sitting outside absorbing moisture, then moisture is what it will take to get them smoothed into the shape you're looking for. I would suggest making a form to wrap the veneer around, then steam or even soak the wood until it's soft ...


1

I do understand that veneer wouldn't probably allow to bend as much as my needed curvature radius of 2 cm This is doable if you don't try to do it with the veneer dry (it's much more flexible and less prone to cracking when dampened, or dampened and heated). However, I don't think the wood can possibly be robust enough by itself. But, just like with paper, ...


1

Eraser. It is soft enough to dig into the scratches to remove the pencil line but not hard enough to scar the wood.


1

I did it with a cheap skilsaw and cheapest 60t blade. taped the veneer and cut with the veneer side down, clamped a board to it for a guide. Just slow and even, and ho ld the cut off so it could not drop. PERFECT - no chipping. nothing fancy or expensive but a great result.


1

Make a zero clearance table saw insert. It reduce chipping a lot. check woodgears.ca


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