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7

To be honest, moving a 500 lb slab of wood by yourself sounds very dangerous. If you're the only one home and you manage to drop it on yourself, you could end up rather dead, and nobody wants that. That said... I would suggest a very sturdy cart with locking wheels to move the piece around on and a second to provide stability when you're working on the ...


5

The piece of wood you are talking about is bigger then your work area (14 foot slab in a 13 foot area) Realistically in your current shop space you are not going to be able to work with any wood that you can't handle. Heck even ripping a an 8 foot 2x4 into a couple of 1x4s is beyond what your shop can handle, without opening the doors. Right now it's ...


4

As with so many tool selection questions, a good place to start would be to ask yourself what you want to do with it. If you have a specific need in mind, then choose the tool that's better for that. For example, if you plan to build a whole kitchen's worth of cabinets, the table saw is probably what you want. If you're interested in making bandsaw boxes, ...


4

I have found the following answer by @Tester at https://diy.stackexchange.com/a/33313/52164 It depends on what you're cutting, why you're cutting it, and what type of cuts you're making. Long Straight Cuts When it comes to long straight cuts, a table saw is the best in the business. Set the fence, turn it on, and it'll cut the same width pieces forever. ...


3

(I'm going to assume that what you're asking about is "HVLP" (High Volume, Low Pressure) vs airless sprayers. "HPLV" would be another way to describe what are normally called "traditional" spray guns. Traditional spray guns used full shop pressure, typically 90psi, at the air cap. This meant there is a very fast air stream that results in a lot of ...


3

An engine hoist may be useful for the tasks you require. A typical hoist has gear designed to bolt into an engine block, which would also mean you'd have to either drive screw eyes (strong ones!) into your slab or build a bracket around it to which you would attach the lift. Engine hoists are usually mobile and some will disassemble easily enough for ...


3

My background is doing set construction / assembly / disassembly in theatres. We commonly need to move large/heavy objects (as in thousands of pounds) and they often have weird and ungainly shapes (we once moved a tree across town and suspended it in mid air with the bottom of the "trunk" above head height, attached at the last minute to something that wasn'...


2

I have absolutely no experience with any of this, but if I wanted to do this, I would be dreaming about an electric overhead traveling crane. (There is a fairly comprehensive write-up with nomenclature and design considerations here, I am sure your can find a lot more information on the web.) While these things are mostly used in industrial environments, ...


2

Just about any grease or petroleum removal liquid will do a decent job of cleaning the ways and other contact parts. The key aspect of this cleaning process is to lubricate and protect those surfaces once the gunky sticky preservative is removed. Straight kerosene will work just as well as expensive WD-40. There are a number of lubricants well suited for ...


2

To make something like this from a single piece of ply I think the only reasonable way is by laser. This literally looked like a laser path when I first saw the image of your proposed design. Every other method I can think of, including CNC1, would create 'kerfs' wide enough that this would be hopelessly loose and floppy — 1/8" gaps? In terms of how ...


2

This is similar to beading curvy edges. Tools similar to beading tools can be used. Bring it close with whatever cutting tool you can - chisel, hand plane, knife or so. Then make a scratch stock to finish it off and to make it consistent everywhere. Scratch stock or beading tool can have whatever profile you want, but you have to file a piece of thin metal ...


2

as far as moving the slab to and from storage. having some sort of clamp with wheels seems like a common solution to moving them with only one person. i have watched this guys videos before and seen him use it to move very large slabs easily. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dZFruJITY2w


1

I had this exact dilemma. In fact, most of us probably did. My decision came down to which I would use more for my needs, which I determined would be the table saw. Of course, we don't know your needs. Since I already had a jigsaw, I figured that would do fine for a while. I ended up making a box for it, mounted an inverted jigsaw inside it, and used ...


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