13

If you feel it must be sealed up, some nicely placed HVAC aluminum tape will do the trick. A careful application at the edge of the table and bring it to the sides with a little turn-down to seal it up. I do agree with Rob that 4" round will give plenty draw.


11

I wouldn't worry about it unless you hook everything up and find that you aren't getting good enough suction. In fact, you don't want to completely seal up the saw, or else there won't be enough air intake to feed the dust collection port. Airflow in must equal the airflow out. If you starve the dust collector by sealing up the table saw too much, you'll ...


9

In my younger days, I had only this type of drill with which to bore holes. It was often necessary to place the in-line grip on my chest or belt to apply pressure. A board or similar panel provided some dispersal of force against the human body. The side handle served to stabilize the drill and to prevent rotation in an undesirable manner. Addendum: ...


6

Obviously this is questionably safe, even if you can actually fit a 12" blade to your 10" radial-arm saw. While in most cases rotating the material and making multiple cuts works, there are some cases where this isn’t possible (say, the material is only flat on one side). There's a very simple and safe solution that should work for any situation ...


5

I happen to have at least one dull carbide-tipped, alternating angled tooth blade I doubt that it's even possible to create a FTG blade from a ATB blade. You might be able to flatten the tops of the beveled teeth somewhat, so that they're still beveled but leave a flat bottomed kerf, but you'd have to remove a lot of material to do it. Since silicon carbide ...


5

Specifically the Dibond is a laminated material, that when cut to a fairly small size and required to remain rigid under varying pressures from varying directions, repeatedly, may not remain integral or rigid and have a higher potential for failure. I would also be concerned that pushing wood fibers past the laminate sheets may cause some to grab at the skin ...


4

"A" reason is that a drill may not spin its bit nicely and freely once in a material. If the bit "catches" (does not spin nicely and freely), thee entire apparatus will then be the focus of the torque. Whichever of the two, the bit, or the entire-(not itself confronting the material's resistance like the bit does)-apparatus will tend to take the action of ...


3

Really no, it's a deadly proposition. When these blades turn, the centrifugal force tries to tear them apart, so they have a maximum RPM rating which is usually written on the side. Larger diameter means lower RPM. However if you mount the larger blade on your saw, it will spin at the rpm of the motor designed for the smaller one, which means it will spin ...


3

The bigger blade will have more mass than the motor is designed to spin. This could cause issues for the motor, potentially burning it out. This is part of the reason that dado blade sets come in 8" size designed for use in a 10" table saw - you're adding multiple blades where only one normally goes, so by making the blade smaller, you're reducing ...


2

Most kanna irons that I have seen have their own mimi formed by grinding off the corners so the cutting edge is the same width as the mouth. As it is now the iron is cutting a shaving that is wider than the throat. No wonder it chokes. I see a gap between the pin and the chipbreaker. The gap should be convex and not concave so the pin can exert an even ...


2

the mouth just has to be opened up. this looks like a manufacturing defect. Chiseling is probably the fastest way, but you can use files or floats. that cross pin is too thin. It's not necessarily a problem, however, if (1) the blade remains fixed in position as desired and (2) shavings don't get stuck under the chip breaker.


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