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19

There's two ways that immediately pop to mind- one involves spending a significant amount of money, the other a significant amount of time. You can buy replacement miter gauges for most table saws (e.g. Incra) that are very very accurate. Couple that with a good tune-up, and you'll be cutting perfect miters in no time. However, the other option is to make ...


13

After doing a fair bit of research the general consensus is use whatever you have available and you feel comfortable with. That being said, there are several points worth making about all three tools and it's important to note the differences. Dial Works mechanically and usually in 1/1000th of an inch increments. Assuming the rack and pinion are free of ...


13

Typically if you need two or more equal-length parts from a single board, you'll select a board longer than what you need to cut all the parts, cut the board as close to "in half" as you care to, then gang all the pieces together or set up a stop block to cut them to the final equal length. Sometimes you may not cut to final length until after you've ...


10

As you mentioned in your question, using a crosscut sled is an easy and reliable method of making perfect 90 degree cuts on a table saw. If you don't have a sled but your blade is properly aligned parallel to the miter slots, you can use a miter gauge. Most saws include a miter gauge, although some are better than others at locking in their settings without ...


10

The miter sled and precision miter gauge suggested by TX Turner work great for picture frames since your table saw's maximum depth of cut does not become a limiting factor. To make mitered boxes--including shadow boxes with mitered corners--there is another technique that works well, which involves tilting your saw blade and using a crosscut sled. If you ...


9

If you were given a choice between dial, digital and vernier calipers which one should you pick? When I went looking for a caliper I wanted a dial type, based on the following comment in Andy Rae's book Choosing & Using Hand Tools, "A plastic dial caliper is plenty accurate for a woodworker's needs, and costs peanuts compared to more expensive metal ...


7

Measure, mark, place fence, measure again before you cut. E.g. stick your circular saw on the piece like you're about to start, mark the blade position, check with a tape measure before pulling the trigger and adjust fence to correct. Check again after adjusting. With just a circular saw for cuts like that measure distance from edge of blade (remember, ...


7

You've hit on both options. You measure the board to it's exact dimensions, (I have yet to see them exactly 8') then you mark the center. At this point you can either attempt to cut the board centering the line with the miter or you measure the kerf, (usually 1/8") split that in half (1/16") make your line there and follow the new line for the miter. My ...


7

In my opinion, the biggest advantage of cutting your own guides is that you fine-tune them to your table saw's miter tracks. The miter tracks have manufacturing tolerances, and are probably not exactly 3/4 inches. Worse, each miter track is probably a little different in width. When cutting your own guides you can sneak up on the width for each track to ...


6

Since you have tracks available I would suggest making a crosscutting sled, probably the most basic of table saw jigs/appliances. Large piece of plywood or MDF for the base, scrap of plywood or suitable plastic for the runner (or buy commercial track material), a few additional scraps of ply for the fences and that's all the material you need. The width of ...


6

Everything I've read says you need to clamp a waste block on the end of your board to prevent the tear out. It is even recommended to do this if you are using a router or jointer. By keeping the pressure on with a waste block it won't be able to splinter down the board. Source Of course the other option would be to plane toward the center from both sides....


5

You could use the old geometry trick of bisecting a line: http://www.mathopenref.com/constbisectline.html It would require more space of course and something you could use as a larger compass, which could be nothing more than two 2x4's fitted perpendicularly with a pencil taped to the end of one of them and a nail sticking out of the other for a "compass" ...


5

plane inwards from edges. chamfer the far edge and angle the plane. support the edge with sacrificial wood. use a shooting board.


5

I don't want to be left out of this party, so here's my take. No matter how carefully you measure you're always going to have one half slightly larger than the other after the first cut. So you need to cut one slightly short and trim the other to match. I think the biggest thing other answers are missing is the use of a stop block to guarantee a repeatable ...


5

I assume you are talking about using a wood turning lathe and you have mounted the work on the headstock and have the bit mounted in the tailstock. Getting everything lined up on a wood turning lathe will be difficult. They are not made for boring. I would recommend using a drill press instead. If you are making through holes there is no reason to be using ...


5

I do this a lot. That is, I cut 24 bevels on 6 squares of wood. The first trick is get your blade set at a 45 degree angle. Since I started using a digital level (Wixie Digit) it has made the task much easier. Otherwise, you would need to make repeated cuts on scrap until you get your angle. (Two pieces placed bevel to bevel will form a right angle that ...


4

Really, jigsaws are not the best tool for this job. They are far better at cutting through thinner board materials, though even then you may struggle to get a fully straight cut. As you say, nothing supports the blade at the end so it can easily wander off of its intended course. A more expensive jigsaw may have better rollers/support for the blade though ...


4

This YouTube video depicts an extremely clever method for setting a right angle when making a cross-cut sled. It is a so-called five-cut method that depends on precision thickness readings and feeler gauges plus a little arithmetic. It does not rely upon the use of an existing right angle square or triangle. The video shows the entire process for making a "...


4

The quickest way to measure is not to measure at all. The board is a rectangle, therefore opposing sides of it are parallel to each other. Now say you lay your measuring tape across the board like so wherever the middle of the tape is, it will also be the middle of the board (or half of the board width) You can place the tape however you want. You are ...


4

What is the best way to cope with this? Or are my expectations too high? It's hard to tell from your picture, but your issue could be one of a couple of things. It seems like your throat plate is sticking proud of the table saw surface by some amount. You can easily check this using a known straight edge. Shim/de-shim the throat plate as necessary to ...


4

The things I have learned that have been working fine: Dry fit always, then trim until it's good enough. You can stop at good enough. Err on the long side since you can't add some back after you remove it. Measure to what you've actually built instead of what you've designed. Order your cuts so that things that match can be done in bulk. If you need two 20"...


3

It sounds like the detents and/or scale may be improperly calibrated. Sometimes the detents on cheaper saws also have some slop, so you may need to wiggle the blade one way or the other after locking into a detent and before locking the setting in place. Also keep in mind that you should tighten the adjustment knob to lock your setting in place even when ...


3

More of a general comment than an answer: if you are going to use large (4x8) pieces for a project such as the melamine laminate,buy and get the piece cut at Home Depot or a store with a panel cutter, save yourself the hassle of cutting it yourself. If you have to cut it yourself, you have to have a straightedge at least as long as the longest dimension you ...


3

It really depends on the project. If you're gluing up a wide panel, acccumulated error from a series of non-square edges can become significant, unless you take steps to counter that by balancing the errors against each other. A joint might not come together well, showing gaps. On the other hand, in some places the difference may not be visible, or may be ...


3

Bandsaw / (table saw... maybe. Bandsaw I see being preferred.) Mitre sled Clamp(s) I figured the band saw would be a good choice since many support a miter sled or if nothing else you could make one. With all the pieces you only really need to measure two cuts. The other two would be parallel to the previous so a simple fence would suffice there. For the ...


2

The answer is simple. Know the width of your blade's cut. Your average circular saw with carbide teeth will leave about a 1 eighth groove. Other blades may be thinner or thicker. Make your measurements accordingly. In short, do the math. (I feel my reply should have been made with a deep Bangor brawl and a corn cob pipe)


2

I was thinking about LosManos's answer and my comments about my wandering blade. A better variation of his idea for a fence would be to make a "track board" (small piece of plywood or sheet good) and cut a straight line through it. It does not have to be long just enough to get the cut started. Use that on the bottom, with clamps, of the piece that is ...


2

If the blade is not exactly in line and you move the saw exactly in line it might wander off. Try it like this: Take a piece of plywood or other cheap material, between half a meter and a meter in length. ( 2 feet plus/minus however many centimetres you like ). Then clamp a straight piece of something to said wooden piece. Run the jigsay against the ...


2

Or use a scroll saw (essentially, a powered coping saw/fretsaw) to cut these out following a template glued/transferred to the wood, then touch up the edges as needed to make them fit well. Fairly manual-task intensive, but it's a cheaper tool than the laser cutter. How many do you need? (Note that cutting several sheets stacked/pinned together is quite ...


2

This is a very tricky thing without a VERY stout bit and tailstock. If I 'cheat' (not really cheating IMO) and use a drillbit, I generally finish with a bowl/hollowing tool, which I can get very uniform wall thickness, and a centered hole through to the other end. The difficulty is in drilling, once the bit is off-center even as little as half a degree, the ...


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