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17

"Shooting board" refers to a family of jigs that are used for squaring the butts or end-grain of boards with hand planes. They are also used for joinery by planing multiple boards at once in an effort to match joint angles. The basic premise is the same on most of the jigs: two flat boards, one on top of another. The wider of the two boards is placed on the ...


17

It's the former, piling wood in stacks with sticks between them to allow better air flow while also maintaining an even pressure throughout the pieces to limit cupping or warping that occurs during the drying process. You can't really see the sticks in this photo, but this wood has been stickered: By edward stojakovic from chicago, United States (Neat ...


15

While it's correct to say these terms can be used interchangeably they should not, the meanings when used technically are quite distinct. The problem begins with the word drying being overused in product descriptions for paints and other coatings; that is, "drying" is used loosely and therefore will always be inaccurate in some instances. But the concept ...


14

This is where you mortise right through the timber, and hammer wedges into the joint from the other side, in order to mechanically wedge the tenon into the joint. You still use glue as you normally would. See here for examples. I'll include the images here for future reference: Outer wedged: Inner wedged: They're typically used when making doors, and ...


13

Drying is the process of a solvent being removed from a finish by evaporation. For example, water in acrylics or alcohol in shellac. Typically drying processes can be reversed by adding the solvent back to the dried composition, being a physical change. Curing is the process of some chemical reaction finishing (where the polymers become cross-linked thus ...


13

A flush trim bit has the bearing at the bottom of the bit. This is so that it can trim a layer of laminate (i.e. Formica) that has been attached to the top of a smaller substrate (i.e. MDF or particle board) flush to the substrate. A pattern or template bit has the bearing at the top of the bit (between the shank and the cutting blades.) This is so that ...


11

So which is it? Is there a difference between a dutchman patch and a butterfly patch? Yes and no. A Dutchman can be the shape of a butterfly (also called a bowtie) as well as many other shapes. But a butterfly in modern usage typically means a wooden fixing to secure or stabilise a crack. This is yet another example (of many!) of terminology being used ...


11

As discussed in some of the answers to What is the difference between a sabre saw and a jig saw, the terminology has been used differently over time. What we call a scroll saw today (a stationary/benchtop tool with the blade fixed at both ends) was commonly called a jigsaw many years ago. (Source: craigslist) Today's handheld jigsaw (with the blade fixed ...


11

This is a bench hook! A very simple and handy device, it gives you a nice solid fence which you can push a piece of wood (or metal, or whatever) against, holding it steady and allowing you to saw it easily.


11

It is a coped joint. You make it by cutting the adjoining piece at a 45 degree angle, then using the cut line as guide to remove the area below the line. Here is an image of how to do it.


11

A board foot is a volume of wood 1 inch by 12 inches by 12 inches; i.e., 144 cubic inches. If the board is 1/2" thick and 12" wide, one board foot would be 24" long. If the board is 2" thick and 6" wide, one board foot would be 12" long. Note that although rough lumber closer to advertised size than dimensional lumber, it is still often sold in nominal ...


10

A bench hook is quite simply the most useful simple woodworking jig/appliance that the handtool user can make. As Chris Schwarz says about them, "After working with one for a couple weeks, you will wonder how you ever got by without it." In addition to its main purpose as a sawing aid a bench hook can function as a basic shooting board, the large surface ...


10

A dutchman patch is basically using wood to fill a void larger than can be done with filler alone. A butterfly patch is typically used to prevent a check from getting larger, or to reinforce a joint. You could consider a butterfly patch to be a specific case of a more general dutchman patch.


8

Resawing is a type of rip cut (always, without exception). The reason for the different terms is that ripping cuts are all cuts along the grain but not all rip cuts are resawing. Resawing, as the term is used today, refers only to cutting a board across its thickness, i.e. sawing a thick board into two (or more) thinner boards. You are literally re-sawing ...


7

Apparently, they're called "hand wheels"; this lumberjocks post talks about how this person made a vise and called them hand wheels. Searching for hand wheels brings up results.


7

noun da·do \ˈdā-(ˌ)dō It's pronounced with both a long 'a' as in day and a long 'o' as in oh. Primary emphasis (indicated by ') is on the first syllable.


7

From Osborne Wood Products -- It is important to note that our table slides have a camber to them to compensate for the natural sag of the table. Choosing the incorrect type of slide for your table may accentuate the natural sag of the table. In this context, camber is a hump or a dip that offsets the center sag or end sag of the table. (Tables with legs ...


6

The coarse thread of the screw in your photo looks meant for use with particle board or soft woods, much like confirmat screws. Screws with a blunt point like the one in your photo are known as "type b self tapping" screws. You use them with predrilled holes, and the thread on the screw cuts threads into the material. But I don't think I've ever seen that ...


6

In most cases I've seen this term in reference to how to stack layers of cut timber/lumber to air dry. Typically, reusable sticks of uniformly cut 'strips' are used to space the wood apart for better air circulation. This is particularly important if/when wood is cut or resawn from green wood where the moisture content can be very high.


6

I have not heard the term "table saw boat" before, but it seems they refer to the same thing. How to Build a Sled or Boat for a Table Saw Build a sled or boat for your table saw


6

I would call that a credenza: A sideboard, buffet, or bookcase patterned after a Renaissance credence; especially: one without legs Wikipedia adds: particularly one where a central cupboard is flanked by quadrant glass display cabinets which I might generalize to "central cupboard flanked by shelves", I'm not sure I'd require "glass display cabinets"...


5

I've always heard it pronounced "Day-dough"


5

These terms are sometimes used interchangeably but it's incorrect to do so. Drying is a surface level finish whereby the top coat of your finish is dry to the touch and can usually be overpainted, or walked on etc. It's a much more fragile state than being fully cured. Curing means that the coating is completely through and through set. It is generally a ...


5

Kerf From Old English cyrf, cutting, a cuthttp://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/kerf Dado I can't find an answer for this one. But this is an interesting read: http://www.woodworkinghistory.com/glossary_dado.htm Rabbet From Old French rabat, a recess or reduction http://etymonline.com/index.php?term=rabbet Tenon From Old French tenir, to holdhttp://etymonline.com/...


5

Your best 'chance' is using moisture. Basically getting the wood 'wet' and straightening it, then letting it dry straight. Some woods and small bends might work with wetting/moistening the board. However, steaming the board is likely to be the most successful on the widest ranges of species and quality. It also is unlikely to be worth the extra effort vs....


5

As rob pointed out a board ft. 144 cubic inches. When dealing with rough cut lumber that is always how it is calculated for sale. Partially because it is NOT the final dimensions of the board, you will need to plane and join the sides making it smaller. Boards you find in Menards and Home Depot already have had this finishing process done and are ...


5

From Wikipedia: Aircraft plywood High-strength plywood also known as aircraft plywood, is made from mahogany and/or birch, and uses adhesives with increased resistance to heat and humidity. It was used for several World War II fighter aircraft. Although the British-built Mosquito bomber, nicknamed "The Wooden Wonder", was constructed of a plywood ...


5

I think this is a type of barley twist. A Google image search for "barley twist legs" brings up the following pieces, of many, each identified by a private seller or auction house as having legs with a barley twist:


4

Adding to WhatEvil posted, there is another type of wedged through tenon, more precisely referred to as a wedged tusk tenon or a tusk tenon. This one is primarily used for knockdown construction. It has many of the same strengths as other mortise and tenon joinery but doesn't use glue. The "pin" (tusk) length also helps a little to prevent racking. ...


4

To me it looks like a type of joint connector screw or connector bolt. Sometimes the various types of screws for knock-down furniture are also called furniture screws or furniture bolts. Sometimes when I don't know what something is called, I take it to the local hardware store and try to find something that looks the same. Often they don't have the right ...


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