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1

Yet again and again I see in many videos that guys with even more sophisticated sliding table saws inexplicably use the rip fence to make rip cuts. Why would they do it? Usually when you're ripping a board (i.e. cutting in the the same direction that the grain runs), you're cutting along the length of the board, and you're trying to cut it to a certain ...


2

It is much quicker to just use the fence. The sliding panel is big and kind of awkward to set up by myself. The fence can handle material of any size, while the sled has a fixed dimension.


2

Both because you're new to carving and due to the results you're getting I'm going to presume you're relatively inexperienced in sharpening too, so the sharpness of your edges will most definitely have some bearing on what you're experiencing. Now, some variation between the surfaces created when you cut with and against the grain is perfectly normal and ...


0

How can I avoid this? Use a router to cut stopped dados instead. If you're limited to using a table saw, and that saw doesn't happen to have a router table built into it, it's pretty much unavoidable. Is there a trick? Only if you consider using a tool other than a table saw tricky. A different kind of corner joint? Sure, that'll work. I thought you ...


4

There are a multitude of tools that will help you find the angle you're looking for. From the sliding t-bevel that will simply find an angle and allow you to set your miter box to the same angle: Images from Amazon.com To analog protractors that you could hold against one edge to read the angle of the other: To digital versions of the same: To digital &...


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