6

how can I stabilize this without completely ruining the aesthetic of the bench? Assuming that you don't want to fasten it to the floor or install powerful magnets or a massive flywheel, you need to widen the bench's footprint. Often, the legs are splayed outward to accomplish that, but since your bench is already done you might prefer to add a piece under ...


4

It is never a good idea to join shorter boards to create a span to carry any significant loads. Having said that, there will always be situations where the beam may be longer than available material and joining pieces will be a necessary option. The actual layout of the 'beam' pieces is critical. You have not shown the actual arrangement of the boards you ...


4

Your main issue is the large span for the shelves. Plugging in your dimensions into The Sagulator gives a sag of over 1/4" with pine, a tad under 1/4" with oak and around an inch for particle board or MDF. The easiest way to reduce the sag is to have more support for the shelves. Even a single support in the middle (which reduces the span from 85&...


3

A table saw would be the easiest way. Since you don't have one, a track saw should manage fine. It's accurate and easy to setup (as opposed to a regular circular saw). My main concern would be if it can handle the cut in a single pass (both in terms of power and of avaialbe depth of cut). If it has enough depth of cut, doing in a shallow cut and then a ...


3

It appears that one of the possible terms is turnbuckle jack screw. The link connects to a site that sells both metric and SAE versions (link is metric). The kit linked includes the required left hand threaded nut and the right hand threaded nut and the screw itself, of course: The nuts described by David D in his answer do not appear to be available in ...


2

The actual answer was provided in a comment to the question: Yes, cut it back square so that the very top of the joint looks like a butt joint. That should take care of a lot of that fuzzing. [...] – Aloysius Defenestrate Jun 8 '20 at 2:31 This was never clear in the videos I watched. Once I got that part down, I was generally cutting the copes correctly ...


2

Now I want to make fine cuts so that the legs fit into the apron, how can I ensure my cuts are straight? Using a hand saw for fine work is a skill that takes some time to develop. But furniture makers did all kinds of crazy stuff by hand before power tools (or even power!) were available, so it can be done. I can't claim to be that good myself, but here's ...


2

Generally speaking, the exterior doors to your house are (or, at least, can be made) reasonably air tight. You'll want to use similar type seals for your door. I'm thinking a product similar to this self adhesive gasket: Image of M-D 20-ft x 1/2-in Black Door Seal Silicone Door Weatherstrip supplied by Lowes.com. No endorsement of product or vendor intended ...


2

If your looking to just transfer take and transfer angles, you could use a sliding t bevel This is at home depot for under $20.00.


2

I don’t understand the purpose of applying oil to the pad when French polishing. It's a lubricant. That's it basically. Although there have been deliberate attempts to protect the process and keep it under wraps in the past1 there's no jealously guarded proprietary knowledge protected by a Mason-like secret handshake here ^_^ the oil is just to lubricate ...


2

There are a lot of issues to consider in this project. It is not clear how much experience you have nor what tools you have to work with so it is difficult to give specific advice on how to proceed. The shelf layout limits the height of books you can store. You may want to consider varying the height of the shelves such that one shelf handles taller books ...


2

What you're describing is a medium sized solid wood panel that is likely to be "cupping". This is a phenomenon that happens with solid wood boards/panels so the most practical solution for a beginner would probably be to use a different material - such as plywood or MDF. These engineered materials will be perfectly flat from the factory, and are ...


1

I would frame this with 4x4 corner columns extending up the full 6' height. I would frame the elevated floor with 2x6 joists at 16" oc. max. The deck can be 3/4" plywood. In essence your are building a very small house frame. You can make the 13" sides with the remains of the plywood and secure the panels at a the top to a 2x4 top plate and ...


1

If drilling holes in the wall is a permanent or insurmountable objection, here is what I would do after thinking about this for a bit: You need masking tape, superglue (cyanoacrylate or CA glue), and some small strips of thin wood. You'll be using the superglue-and-tape trick. Apply tape to the wall at the height of the tabletop where the strips of wood ...


1

In general, using a strong joint such as a half lap, or a mortise and tenon will be about as strong as if it were a single piece of wood. Think gate construction. Gates are different in that they have all the weight on one side, thus they need a diagonal brace to transfer some of the load. If your frame is supported on both sides, and is made with quality,...


1

The option of using cabling or cording of some sort is best presented with an image, curiously enough, to scale: The blue lines are cord, passed through holes drilled at the intersections of the frame. One could get away with a single continuous piece, but unless it's secured to the frame, you'll still have undesirable flexibility in the frame. Additional ...


1

The fix for my problem was to approach the blade manufacturer Saxton who promptly sent a new blade which cuts as expected. The budget nature of the saw does not seem to have been an issue, and I think my measurements of blade orientation with respect to mitre slots were probably also a red herring. Many thanks to everyone who contributed to this solution - ...


1

I don't know that is has a name. It's an arrangement of hardware designed to provide adjustment for a variety of use cases. In the bottom picture the top part looks like a three hole T-Nut with a threaded rod and then a nut and spring washer. There are T-Nuts that have the nails built in Here's a very rough drawing


1

You've got hydraulic jacks - even cheap ones will lift 2", so lift height isn't critical, so don't try to put your 4x4 vertically - that could be wobbly as it moves during the lift, and it concentrates all the lift force at one point on your structure. Lay 2 4x4s down sideways so that they cross all the 2x12s near each end. Leave clearance for the ...


1

I think I'm following your drawing (though you appear to have books on the shelves - they must be very narrow books to fit on what appears to be narrow shelves). I would suggest that: You clamp all of your vertical pieces to the edge of the top flight of stairs, with their bottoms (still cut square) resting in the proper location (as marked on the uphill ...


1

Alternative recommendation for smoothing without the need for planing stop: a cabinet scraper (card scraper) The other answers look to the work holding issue very well, and can definitely be used with a smoother plane. However, if you are only looking to smoothen, then I recommend an alternative to the plane: a trusty cabinet scraper. Since it is easier to ...


1

Place the dowel on a flat surface. Place a piece of wood on the flat surface whose thickness is roughly that of the dowel radius. Snug this up to the end of the dowel. Draw a line on the end of the dowel using the piece as a guide. Roll the dowel a little. Mark another line. Repeat until you have 5 or 6 lines. The lines should form a little circle (OK, ...


1

I embarked on this mission yesterday and was quite successful by using a heat gun on low heat at first. Once the paint bubbles I used rigid hand scrapper like the ones used to fill holes in walls. Once the main coat of paint was off I used an old toothbrush to apply paint stripper and left for two minutes before brushing with a small metal bristle brush that ...


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