4

Epoxy will work as mentioned in the comments. There are two other possibilities I can think of. One is to drill out the area where the threaded inserts are and glue in a dowel. Once that glue is cured, drill the proper hole to fit the threaded insert. This is a good general solution to many situations where a screw no longer holds. The other option is to ...


3

A table may look simple, but there are some important points to keep in mind when designing one: Wood expands and contracts across its width and depth, but not in its length as a result of seasonal humidity etc. This means that if you notch the corners to accept the legs, while the width of the top will expand the legs will not because they are connected ...


3

I wouldn't use Z-clips, they allow minimally for movement in the orientation needed here. Instead you want my favourite metal tabletop fastening option: These are retailed under various names, I know them as expansion plates but they now seem most commonly sold as stretcher plates. As you can see they have slots in both of the orientations needed for use on ...


3

It's right to be cautious, but this is oak and over an inch in thickness which is really quite thick as far as tabletops go. The Ikea countertop material is also made from glued staves1, which isn't really that similar to a single wide board or 2-3 planks glued along their edges and is likely to be significantly stiffer than either. But as it's best to err ...


2

My question is how to do the glue-up in such a way as to eliminate any gaps where I glue the strips end-to-end in a given row. You don't need to worry overmuch about the tightness (or not) of these staggered end-grain joints as far as strength goes because they're essentially irrelevant in that regard. Occasionally these aren't even glued, without it ...


2

How to tell what type of finish you have: Fortunately, you have some flakes. The finish is water damaged...that's why its lifting. Drop some of the flakes into a glass jar of denatured alcohol.....if they dissolve, you have a shellac finish. If not...put a few flakes into some lacquer thinner....if they dissolve, you have nitro or acrylic lacquer. These ...


2

We have a live edge table with a lot of the flat part of the table being some 2 inches in from the bottom of the live edge. Several times this has caused things to fall off the table, as it keeps people from sitting closer. This is an extreme case. As a kid we had a table with an ogee edge. That edge was narrow enough that it was easy to nick. My take: ...


2

Like some of the comments said, the first thing to do is to determine why the cracks opened up in the first place. Broadly, there are two potential causes. Either seasonal movement was not being allowed for or the boards were not given proper time to acclimatize. What you should do is examine the construction of the base of the table and how it is ...


1

I'm working on designing a table for my kitchen (no A/C for moisture control) and I'm not entirely sure what the best method for securing it would be, and if I should even bother accounting for expansion/contraction at the size of this table and the material. I think the simple answer to this among professional builders would be, the same method I always ...


1

TL;DR warning I guess.... The first quarter-section of the table run we stained was left on too long (~8 minutes). It was clumpy when wiping off the wet stain and it dried looking streaky and uneven. Note this does not apply here, I'm including it for completeness. For future reference the ideal time to tackle streaking in a stain job is right then, not ...


1

Short answer, yes. I should caution you that 0000 steel wool won't polish it per se, rather it will have the opposite effect of scratching the surface (they're very very fine scratches, but scratches nonetheless). So even lubricated by wax you'll be left with a somewhat satin or semi-gloss finish. If you want something glossier than this you should go ...


1

Don't worry about the end-to-end butt joints. I think you mentioned the right answer in your question. Make sure that the ends are square, put some glue on them, then as you're gluing up the sides of the long boards, make sure to push the butt joints together firmly. The butt joints don't have any structural significance (as long as they're staggered ...


1

I'd glue up the individual pieces first. Use a dowel in the end to keep it aligned and add some strength to the end grain to end grain joint. Make sure you have good, clean ends. If you are making the cross cuts with a table saw, flip every other board top to bottom. This will cancel out any slight deviation from 90°. Once all of the pieces are glued to ...


1

Dewaxed shellac is the traditional way of sealing knots, sap veins, ... and has worked for me Bulls Eye Clear Shellac is one of many brands, brush or in a spray can.


1

Welcome Ethan. Where splits are linear, I would consider a butterfly or other brace, but when the split is around circular grain, I'm sure it's usable. Worth a try, I suppose. A "butterfly" is a separate piece of wood that crosses the split, glued into a slot you've chiseled into the host. It is an advanced technique, I would say, but if you're up to it, ...


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