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I had tightened the adjustment screws down further based on some other comments I've seen online, but it wasn't until I went to Lowe's last night and looked at the one on display that I realized that they needed to be screwed in even further. After adjusting them so that they were actually below the surface by a few turns, and then adjusting it from there to ...


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Since it wasn't touched on in the Question and hasn't been addressed since do make sure your blade is clean. If you've been cutting a resinous wood, or certain sheet goods, the blade could have resin buildup on and around the teeth and this can significantly affect cutting performance. I wanted to lead with this as you mention you're a blade rookie so you ...


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Aside from ensuring that your saw is set up correctly (e.g. that the blade is parallel to the bed and fence of your saw table), it's important to be aware of the different types of blade and how they will affect the cutting performance and finish. Ideally, you will use a ripping blade for ripping cuts and a crosscut blade for cross cuts - it's not just the ...


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Your situation could be a couple of things. First, whatever you're using to brace/hold the workpiece as it meets the blade is not parallel to the blade. That could mean your blade is not parallel to the miter slot (which is most likely) or that you're using the original miter gauge to support the workpiece and its slide bar is loose in the miter slot which ...


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I would start by getting a micrometer and making sure the blade is exactly parallel to the miter slot. If it's slightly off, the back end of the blade will hit the wood and burn it. Two, are you using a splitter to hold the piece open as you pass the piece through? Without a splitter the wood can close up on the blade and the back end of the blade will be ...


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