The Stack Overflow podcast is back! Listen to an interview with our new CEO.
10

As a DIYer, there's no compelling reason for you to go out shopping for a 14" table saw. That said, if you're asking because there happens to be a 14" table saw available to you for an irresistible price, there's nothing inherently wrong with it, but there are some things to be aware of: If you're in the US, you won't be able to get 5 hp out of a ...


9

The missing part is going to be a handwheel that attaches to the shaft that's about one-third from the left side of the arc cut into the side of the machine. As it turns, the motor assembly and saw blade will raise and lower as desired. As FreeMan suggests, grab the shaft with pliers, although that will degrade the surface of the shaft. Consider to pad the ...


5

I don't think you're going to get the result you want if you make these cuts with a table saw. Cutting large pieces on a table saw comes with a lot of challenges in terms of maintaining the alignment of the work piece with the blade to get a clean, consistent cut. And cutting large pieces always brings the risk of kickback from your saw. I sometimes sort ...


4

Another good idea, especially if you're making multiple cuts, is to build a jig out of plywood that has runners to fit into the mitre gauge slots on the bottom, and a square to blade raised edge on the top side to rest your boards against. You can use dimensional lumber for square edge to be sure it has flat surfaces to work with. The piece of plywood needs ...


4

The printed gradients on table saw controls are just guidelines. At least in most cases. We aren't talking about computer-guided cutting heads here. You would want to set up your cuts for square and angles by hand as a matter of course, and then try a few test cuts to see how they match. Some consideration for how to feed stock, how to make multiple cuts so ...


4

I had tightened the adjustment screws down further based on some other comments I've seen online, but it wasn't until I went to Lowe's last night and looked at the one on display that I realized that they needed to be screwed in even further. After adjusting them so that they were actually below the surface by a few turns, and then adjusting it from there to ...


4

Fine Woodworking is typically considered as using only solid hardwood for construction. Portable saws are made for the construction industry. What is considered as "accurate" on a job site, say 1/16 of an inch, is not very accurate by fine woodworking standards, where 1/64 or higher tolerances are sometimes required. In keeping with that definition, here ...


3

Make or buy a zero tolerance insert for your tablesaw. This will give cleaner cuts, and not give a place for the off cuts to drop into.


3

I have a Grizzly tablesaw with the same fence type. I find that when I adjust the fence it is not necessarily square when I move it to the desired dimension. I have to tighten the fence in place to get a fully accurate parallel setting for the fence and blade. Once I have set and unset the fence I can adjust it small amounts without appreciable changes in ...


3

Table saws are often used to cut full sheets of plywood, so your table top can certainly be cut with great accuracy provided you have adequate support for the panel at infeed, outfeed, and side. The outfeed and side are usually supported with mobile tables and rollers and I have seen fold up tables hinge attached to the table saw in lieu of tables on the ...


3

Even on high quality equipment the markings on the miter gauge and blade tilt is often not accurate use a good drafting triangle to get accurate 45's & 90's. If you are in a metro area look for used equipment often times you can find very good deals. As said above "There are lots of how to guides on Youtube and elsewhere for setting up table saws ...


2

From what I have read, this is not all that unusual on contractor saws. What is happening is that as the motor slows down, it slows at a different rate than the belt, so there is some slippage as the speeds equalize. Here is a link to a post on Woodnet that describes it in more detail. As long as it is running fine when under power, there really isn't ...


2

You do not need any special tools to set up the table saw. Use the included instructions for setting up the saw. This saw will be good for the things that you mentioned, but the blade may need to be changed. Tablesaws usually ship with a cheap utility blade. For best results, replace the blade with a sharp high-quality blade that is suited to the task you ...


2

We can't really help you with any specific vendors that you couldn't find yourself with some internet sleuthing, but one way you can solve this is to find a machinist or metalworker in your area that can repair or recreate suitable parts for you. What you show is just a worm-gear arrangement of some kind. Depending on the damage, such parts can often be ...


2

Whilst I don't know, I believe Craftsman made quality tools before the cost accountants got hold of them. Your questions are really centred on two things: Safety Accuracy IS it still electrically safe? No aged or worn insulation No-volt release switch present? Blade guard and slitting knife in place and working (Though I know many Americans don't ...


2

It sounds like your main problem is that you're cutting on the wrong side of a tilted blade. However, for cutting picture frame miters you should not have the blade tilted at all. In general you should always have the work piece flat on the table if possible. This is a lot more stable (and therefore more accurate) than putting the piece up on edge. To ...


2

I did a quick search using the terms "makerspace toronto" and came up with a number of links. One of the links is a collection of locations in the area. In such a metropolitan area as Toronto, you'll likely find a makerspace with a table saw. Additionally, makers in such organizations may have personally owned equipment. Our local makerspace does not have a ...


1

I can't give an exact height; those stands usually end up being a pretty 'normal' (if there is such a thing!) height. What I'd strongly suggest, though, is that you design your bench at the height you want, and simply drop the saw into a big hole in the top of it. Among other things, that will ensure that you can make the saw dead flush with the top, and ...


1

Since it wasn't touched on in the Question and hasn't been addressed since do make sure your blade is clean. If you've been cutting a resinous wood, or certain sheet goods, the blade could have resin buildup on and around the teeth and this can significantly affect cutting performance. I wanted to lead with this as you mention you're a blade rookie so you ...


1

Aside from ensuring that your saw is set up correctly (e.g. that the blade is parallel to the bed and fence of your saw table), it's important to be aware of the different types of blade and how they will affect the cutting performance and finish. Ideally, you will use a ripping blade for ripping cuts and a crosscut blade for cross cuts - it's not just the ...


1

Your situation could be a couple of things. First, whatever you're using to brace/hold the workpiece as it meets the blade is not 90 degrees to the blade. That could mean your blade is not parallel to the miter slot (which is most likely) or that you're using the original miter gauge to support the workpiece and its slide bar is loose in the miter slot which ...


1

I would start by getting a micrometer and making sure the blade is exactly parallel to the miter slot. If it's slightly off, the back end of the blade will hit the wood and burn it. Two, are you using a splitter to hold the piece open as you pass the piece through? Without a splitter the wood can close up on the blade and the back end of the blade will be ...


1

The cheap contractor table saws* are not accurate, the better ones seem to be good, although lacking power and capacity. Having said that the upper half of them would work for most people's woodworking, could be a little inconvenient. Some people put me to shame using junk saws.(*currently with aluminum tops) I personally use a 50's vintage Craftsman cast ...


1

When you are cutting plywood on the tablesaw, the risk of kickback is proportional to the width/length. Width is the distance from the fence to the blade and length is the length of the work-piece that rides against the fence. I am comfortable cutting anything where the width is less than the length. Minimize the risk of kickback when breaking down sheet ...


1

If you don't want to use screws that's fine, many woodworkers have a philosophical objection to them (not just when seen, using them at all) and they're entitled to that view. Except for utilitarian stuff like workshop storage I totally get it when the screws would be visible, I hate that too unless they're firmly part of the design1, but it is a shame not ...


1

Although this isn't quite what you asked about it does provide additional support on the in-feed side which is the heart of what you're seeking so perhaps it will do what you want: This is an old tip supplied by a reader or contributor to Fine Woodworking that I came across while reading last night and I immediately thought of this Question. Taunton have ...


1

I have a saw like yours. I don't have an in feed extension, but when cutting wide sheet goods I often use an extension on the fence. I clamp an old four foot level to the face of the fence (any thing long and straight with parrallel sides would work). The level extends about a foot past the fence on the in feed side. This let's me register a lot more of the ...


1

Originally posted as a Q&A, but marked as duplicate. Aftermarket riving knives tend to range from unavailable to sub-optimal. The function of the riving knife is to keep the wood from catching on the rising teeth of the blade. This can happen either through operator error, or from the wood springing to a new shape with the creation of the kerf. ...


1

It is possible it could be the blade, try turning the blade around backwards and see if the "high" spots become the "low" spots. A little bit of movement on the arbor can make a lot of movement on the end of the blade though. The washer that goes on the outside of the blade could not be sitting flat and allowing the blade to wobble as well. I used this video ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible