10

I have never tested it, but I would think that a chipper, with only two teeth, might be quite risky. In a standard blade the teeth are secured in their path by the blade disc which serves to guide and support the teeth in the desired path. Without the rotating mass of the blade disc, I would worry that it is much easier for something to go wrong to make ...


7

Is it safe to use just the chippers in a dado stack? No. The chippers are designed to do just that — chip out the middle of a groove being cut on either side by both outside blades. Some dado stacks come with instructions that state not to use the chippers without both blades, example from Freud, sixth bullet point from bottom: "Always use both ...


5

The fairly comprehensive manual for this specific model does not show the holes indicated in the image. One of the later pages of the manual shows lubrication points for the mechanisms involved in tilt and height, but those points do not coincide with the holes. It is possible that the holes are related to the manufacture of the product, perhaps involving ...


5

To define the lingo: Arbor is the threaded shaft that comes out of the motor onto which the saw blade is mounted. Arbor Washer goes around the arbor, just like the saw blade does, but is much smaller in diameter than the blade and doesn't have any teeth. Some saws have a washer on each side of the blade, some only have one on the "outside" of the ...


4

To me it looks like you've got a stripped belt. It's a bit hard to tell for sure from your photos but it looks very much to me like the spindle and wheel which are connected by the belt are gear-like, to accept a toothed belt, and it looks like the belt was originally toothed, but that the teeth have worn away. Your belt should look something like this: ... ...


4

Higher RPMs will also make better cuts, and extend the blade life, if the commercial cutting industry is to be believed. Many commercial lumberyards like to run their cutters between 10,000 and 18,000 surface feet per minute (SFPM). 18,000 would be a maximum ceiling, so they often aim for 15,000 SFPM. Diameter * Pi * RPM / 12 = SFPM At 10 inches and 5000 RPM ...


4

I would say that there should be no good reasons for this to happen. All that should be required is that you tighten the nut correctly, and then as others have said, the spin direction of the spindle combined with the thread direction of the nut should work to tighten it. Given that it's happened twice to you and that there seem to be several other people in ...


3

According to the manual, they are number 6 items, extra guard shims. This implies that one can adjust the spacing of the blade guard when attaching the guard to the table. Did you get a manual with the saw?


3

I decided to go out on a limb and buy a stack to know for sure, and... It fits! There is a verry small amount of play before tightened, but any less and the blades would scrape over the arbor. I believe this is a proper 5/8" arbor. I do not know about other manufacturer's arbor dimensions, but if you have a DeWalt, you may be in luck. If you are ...


3

I have an audio spectrogram app on my tablet, so I took it into my workshop and made a couple of measurements, using the power tools I had setup for a project (table saw, orbital power sander, and trim router; don't have a power planer, sorry). I used all softwood material (18mm pine), kept the tablet about 1m from the tool, and decoupled it from the ...


2

I know I'm really late to the party on this guys, but since I only heard half of the answer, I want to toss in. It is dangerous for two reasons: first, as stated, torque. It DOES take significantly more energy to move that many large blades. Especially when they're tearing through a substance as chewy as wood. The other one, as briefly touched upon by the OP,...


2

The short answer is "no," but I'll elaborate. The dimensions are very critical in this area since small variances at the arbor can have huge effects at the edge of the blade. Also the motor spindle could have been treated differently for the euro model and it could bend or break. If the arbor is even a small fraction oversized, the blade won't fit. ...


1

There are a lot of ways to do this, but personally I would do stopped cuts on the table saw. I would definitely not try to stack multiple pieces though. (If you have access to a high-powered bandsaw that might be a better choice.) For the longer rip cut I would use the fence and clamp a stop block to it to prevent overshooting your line. For the crosscut ...


1

The fix for my problem was to approach the blade manufacturer Saxton who promptly sent a new blade which cuts as expected. The budget nature of the saw does not seem to have been an issue, and I think my measurements of blade orientation with respect to mitre slots were probably also a red herring. Many thanks to everyone who contributed to this solution - ...


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