3

Go for it! I think this will be solid enough, especially with the stretchers down low. The cherry legs on this taper to about an inch square. The top is concrete and about 60#. It held an espresso machine that was probably about 50# without shaking. Btw, there's a drawer in there, so it wasn't solid apron all around. Edit: a few more dimensions... legs are 1-...


3

would like some tips on how this can be done. As I mention above in the Comments, this is a typical joint in Chinese furniture (and I think in other Asian furniture traditions as well, although I don't know how they do the joinery). However, as I indicated if this is a Western piece it could be done in any number of ways and the added photo of the underside ...


2

Im afraid of the table swaying or racking...and was wondering if I could use paracord to diagnolly brace the legs to prevent this No. Real, military-spec paracord is required to stretch a minimum of 30%, and is therefore not a good choice for preventing racking. Ive heard that steel cable can be used, but its expenisve Sure. Even steel cable stretches a ...


2

Any advice would be greatly appreciated. 3/16” over the length and width of the table isn’t much; if you put the top on the base and leave it unattached, it might flatten out on its own after a week or two. You could encourage it by putting something heavy, like a box of books (or two) in the middle. Whether that helps or not, you can probably also pull it ...


2

To summarize comments on the original question: There is nothing that says that you must use an expensive, commercially produced jig to make the mortise for these hinges (or any hinges, for that matter). You can make your own router template out of a piece of hardboard or plywood. Use a piece about 1/4" (6mm) thick, cut out a hole the precise ...


1

There are a couple reasons for cupping like this. The first is assembly if you don't pay attention to the glue up job or don't actually make your joints square, you can get this, sometimes with rather exaggerated bends. It doesn't really sound like that is the case here, and I would certainly hope that a professional shop with any reputation wouldn't screw ...


1

As long as the holes in the metal bars are larger than the width of the screws, it will be fine. 5mm play or more should be enough. Over time, you can re-tighten the screws if the wood movement is an issue.


1

In my experience getting nice miter joints would be the most difficult way to get these. if done well, likely the 'prettiest' way to do it. I also think trying to get have it 'filled in' with the center core would raise the difficulty, since with a hollow center you'd have more wriggle room to try and align your miter cuts. In and out back and forth etc. ...


1

(This question isn't really an ideal fit for this site, as you're basically asking "how do I do this project". The question of species is really opinion-based because almost anything would work. Since you're new here, though, I'll give you an answer anyways.) If you're painting it then poplar is a good choice. It's easy to work with and strong ...


1

Years later, I found out that the hairpin leg must be attached to the top board in a way that the angle between the board and the leg is not 90 degrees. The legs should look a little spread to make it stable.


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