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2

If we ignore or fix the bracket-shelf joint failure Martin Bonner mentioned and assume that the shelf touches the wall, but is not attached to it in either case, I expect design B to put lower forces on the wall joint. This maters if you screw it into drywall with no studs behind. In case of A, weight placed on the edge of the shelf pulls shelf away from ...


4

If this is going into drywall the weakest point is probably the attachment of the wall flange to the wall. With regards to this joint design B is substantially better than design A, since in A the shelf can pivot out from the wall and apply a tension force to the anchors (i.e. pulling them out). In design B the shelf will be against the wall and the force ...


3

It depends. Shelf B has a failure mode not available to Shelf A; specifically, the joint between the brackets and the shelf is in tension, so it can separate. On the other hand, if both shelves fail because the brackets pull out of the wall or the shelf breaks then this failure mode is irrelevant. There are two ways round this failure mode. One solution ...


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