4

3/4 plywood over a 3' span is likely to be fine as long as she does not sit or climb up on it, or leave heavy objects near the edge for long periods of time. I am sitting at a desk, as i right this that is 3/4 plywood spanning 6' and it is fine. If i put a straight edge on it i think i may see a sag of about an 1/8", with out my heavy arms resting on ...


3

The indicated joint could be created using mortise and tenon, dowel pins, or biscuits. I suspect the level of strength is in that order as well. It's less likely that this joint is connected using pocket screws, but you could also accomplish a strong connection in that manner, and fill the screw holes. Gluing is implied in all cases.


3

Basically, you're building a swing set for a single swing with a 200lb rider. The difference is that this swing can go a full 360° instead of just back-and-forth. Treating this as a "shelf" and using the Sagulator, I picked Eastern White Pine as an example of the standard type of "SPF" (spruce, pine, fir) that you're likely going to pick up at the local big ...


2

From my view, the easiest way to make this angle miter stronger is with pocket hole screws and glue. The pocket hole setup only requires the drilling to be done on one piece. After the holes are set, clamp the two pieces together and insert the screws. All the normal low price jigs for the other joints are designed for 90^ or straight on joints. You could ...


2

Take a look at how wood is used to make load-bearing spans in any construction. For static loads, the idea is to transfer the loads to the floor, and thence to the ground, with minimal deflection (under normal loads) and without danger of sudden catastrophic failure. There are three main ways of achieving this: Use dimensions large enough to resist ...


2

Your main issue is the large span for the shelves. Plugging in your dimensions into The Sagulator gives a sag of over 1/4" with pine, a tad under 1/4" with oak and around an inch for particle board or MDF. The easiest way to reduce the sag is to have more support for the shelves. Even a single support in the middle (which reduces the span from 85&...


1

Breaking your arrows 1-by-1 is certainly better than breaking them all at once! :) You could use aluminum arrows, but they might bend instead of breaking. Carbon fiber would shatter. Wood will break. AIUI, it's the nature of the beast, and part of the cost of "doing business" (or participating in the sport). All sporting equipment will wear out and/...


1

Use the Sagulator to find out. I entered your dimensions, assumed a load of 30 lbs distributed over the top, and said you're using 3/4" fir plywood. The total calculated sag was 0.01", which seems quite acceptable.


1

If you use pocket screws for all the major joints here you don't have to have any particular worries about strength, they are very very strong if everything is done right1. Since this will see exposure to some weather (and the water from watering the plants I guess) be sure to use exterior-rated screws in the pocket holes. How do I prevent it from tipping ...


1

Metal is not necessary for this project. You really only need solid sturdy wide gussets on the sides, and solid sturdy overall construction. 2x4's, Plywood sheathing. Quality wheels wheels will make a huge difference. I could write a long tutorial but photos will be better than words. Here are a couple of shots of the art walls in my friends studio/gallery.


1

The structure I designed below seems stable enough on paper... I would disagree with your appraisal. For clarity I refer to the direction of the triangular base pieces as 'front/back' and the overhead beam as 'side to side'. While the triangles give the structure stability front to back, there is little to no bracing side to side. All the stress of the ...


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