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21

Is it better to store wood vertically or horizontally? It depends a bit on the status of the wood when you store it, but generally it's better to store wood horizontally. When storing wood, you have to consider three of the major forces at work: moisture, heat, and gravity. The moisture content of wood is ever-changing, generally starting from an ...


17

A quick google search found me this website, which has a nifty compatibility chart that I've attached below. Cole-Parmer has a very comprehensive compatibility chart for many solvents (organic or otherwise). For some common solvents, I've summarized some info from Cole-Parmer: Turpentine is no good for ABS plastic, brass, EPDM, LDPE, rubber, neoprene, and ...


17

MDF is heavy and we all know that. Like keshlam says if it is not supported across its vertical span then it will pull itself down slowly warping it. Gravity is a [w]itch. Now if you cannot store it perfectly vertical then you are not out of options. I couldn't imagine the space needed for some larger sheets however you should be able to get away from ...


16

You can "collapse" them into much smaller hoops (see http://www.woodmagazine.com/woodworking-tips/techniques/skills/folding-bandsaw-blades-simple-as-one-two-three/). It brings it down to about a third of the size and can be stored in a drawer. From the page: Hold the blade in front of you with one hand, keeping the teeth pointing away from you. Wear a ...


16

I have something akin to an answer, but I might consider it more like advice. Rust begets Rust- purely anecdotal, but I feel like rust left unattended promotes more rust. I would first work to rid yourself of as much rust as possible. Things like naval jelly, baking soda and similar will be your friends. Moisture is the enemy - Whether it be your home, your ...


12

The gel is something similar to Stripcoat (http://www.evanscoatings.com/). Prior to the bit being placed in individual packages, they can be bumped together. The hot melt coating on them keeps the edges intact during handling. Some of the coatings also have a layer of oil to protect against rust. I have a few pounds of this stuff I keep in my shop for ...


8

Systainers are all made by, or licensed from Tanos. There are two main styles - the classic style and the TLoc. The TLocs can stack on top of the classics, but not vice-verse. Several vendors, most notably Festool, but also Metabo, Fein, Makita, Veritas, and Mirka either use or offer as an option Systainers for their tool storage. You can also ...


8

Silica gel packets won't work well if your tools are on shelving. They'll just dry out the surrounding air, which will be replaced by other moist air. But, if your tools are in boxes, silica gel packets will be fairly effective. Naturally, the larger packets are more effective than the smaller ones. I've always had good results with them.


8

Don't worry about it- for most bits other than straight bits, you won't get the protective gel off without tearing it up anyway. I keep those little packets of silica gel that seem to accompany many products today and throw one in any closed drawer or enclosed space. In my portable toolchest, I keep a piece of chalk or two, which also absorb moisture.


8

I think the answer to this is actually both in terms of real-world applications; the ideal is to store all wood and wood products flat, but that's not always possible. And sometimes it's not needed — smaller off-cuts can safely be stored standing upright, as there's little or no risk of them bowing under their own weight. Solid wood in plank form can ...


8

If you lean stuff against a wall at an angle, it's weight will tend to cause it to bow. If you can stand it fully upright with support on both sides that will be less likely to happen. Or you can figure out a way to support it lower down, so the middle can't sag. Or, of course, you can lay it flat if you have space to do so (most folks don't). Or delay ...


7

I would certainly worry about assembly in the cold, and anything you are going to glue needs to be above 50F for the glue to work properly anyway. Moisture is the bigger worry, and in the northern climes winter is pretty dry, add cold to that and you are looking at issues when the project warms up and is exposed to more moisture. So yes, I would recommend ...


6

When is [spalting] good for the wood and when isn't it good? Spalting can provide a lovely patterning to wood that would otherwise be more plain. Please see the image below for an example of spalted maple. (source) Maple is usually otherwise fairly plain-looking (assuming it's not figured maple), and the spalting provides a bit of interest in an ...


5

It depends. The most notable feature of these storage systems is that you can stack one case on top of another and engage one or more latches to securely fasten it to the case below. The idea is that you can stack as many as you want, though stacking them in this manner quickly becomes impractical in terms of actually accessing your tools. (Source) For ...


5

Camelia oil. It is very affordable (around 15€ per liter), it doesn't stain, nor gum (nor smell, nor taste). It's not aggressive to the skin or otherwise hazardous to your health (in fact you could drink it, and you could use it as lotion and for your hair, indeed many high-quality body oils contain camelia). Apply a few drops with a dispenser and spread ...


5

WD40 is much better (I find) when not applied with an aerosol; get it by the litre and brush it on with a rag. That's my usual method, and it works fine (except when I forget). I do it every single time I'm going to not use a tool for more than a couple of hours. The smell is far less than when spraying the stuff. With wax, if you want to avoid having to ...


5

In general spalting is not good for wood. It is one of the stages of the wood rotting. But spalting in the early stages can add character to a piece of wood. Such as Turners use spalted wood all the time because of the pretty colors and patterns that arise. In lumber it is more difficult. because logs don't tend to rot evenly, so while you might get ...


5

Keep your outside wood elevated, level and well supported. Place horizontal supports a maximum of 4' apart with at least 4" above the floor or ground. Allow for plenty of airflow placing 1/2" spacers between each layer of wood on the stack. Separate pieces on the same level by 1/2" as well. Keep them out of the weather. A shed is best, but a waterproof ...


5

"Lay your plane on it's side son." This is the long-standing advice. It is old, nobody knows how old, but many (most?) now don't do this, some to deliberately buck Old Timer advice (which can often seem folksy and overly cautious*) but some because they've thought through the problem and come to a definite conclusion not to. The evidence is in and it ...


4

Get the tools rust free by polishing with steel wool or scotch brite, wipe clean with oily rag-- leaving a very fine oily film, then apply a soft wax-- I have had good success with Johnson paste wax. If you can't ensure a low moisture environment, the wax film will do as anything else to prevent reformation of rust but leave the tool useable. If the ...


4

I agree with the all the suggestions to use oil. I glued a piece of carpet on a board next to my bench. Whenever I am finished with a tool - I squirt oil on the carpet and rub the tool against it. This is easy and saves oil. If you already have rust - I have found that the "SandFlex Flexible Abrasive Block, Fine Grit" - is excellent at cleaning up ...


4

One other common solution is heat. Heat your toolbox. Sometimes the tools end up being colder than the surrounding air and the moisture condenses on the tool causing rust, heating would solve this. Heating the air also lowers its relative humidity. This might seem like a weird solution but it is fairly commonly used to protect firearms. And one of the ...


4

They can be hung in an out of the way corner. Ideally on a piece of wood with a curved channel the blade rests in so the it doesn't kink.


4

In order to protect it, I'm planning on using some of the plastic wrap that is used typically when transporting and taking delivery of such items. I would not suggest storing any wooden item in a plastic bag or wrapped in plastic. Especially in areas subject to fluctuations in heat and humidity (i.e., basements), plastic is notorious for condensing ...


4

Can I use the the plastic wrap for this amount of time without damaging the furniture or will I need to preform additional preparations or seek another solution? I don't think you can assume that type of plastic is safe for long-term direct contact with some finishes, varnishes in particular and some lacquers (it is very likely the bed is varnished or ...


3

Some of the images I just posted to another Question apply here too:


3

Bluing is used to protect firearms from rusting, and according to that Wiki article, has been used to protect tools. I remember from my hunting days that we would have a bottle of bluing, and give everything a good wipe down at the end of the trip.


3

Seal the ends as wood loses moisture from the ends faster than the face. You are trying to lower moisture throughout the wood evenly. Latex paint is a cheap effective sealer. Pick a location with good airflow; you want the wood to dry and not rot. Outside is fine but you will need to protect it from the weather. Sticker and stack. upon a base that will keep ...


3

No, stacking will lead to visible marks. Possible effects include dents (or indented stripes from board edges), extra-matte areas, patterns matching the overlying material. Even you don't notice the effect directly, you will see it in raking light (or worse, you will see when installed as a ceiling above the windows). Thinner coats will help but that leads ...


2

I use Silicone lubricant, not WD-40. This is mostly for my table tops and such. March/April I go through my shop and use Silicone on all my metal topped machines (table saw, joiner etc) to keep them from rusting in as the moisture content in the air rises and the tops are still cold condensing the water and causing rust. One good thing about Silicone is ...


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