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Buy a new door. Refinishing Unless there's something unusual about the door that's not evident from the description it literally isn't worth the time and effort to strip and refinish. Even if you price your time at $0.00 (which is fine, many do for home projects) there's a strong argument to be made that it's still not worth the costs involved, unless you ...


4

Normally I'd have asked in the Comments for the specifics of what you'd used here as often knowing the exact products used is vital to diagnosing an issue, but I don't think it matters here as something else led to the uneven result you got. So first off your tabletop is almost certainly oak as you thought. I only mention this as it's relevant to a few of ...


4

Pine plywood (project panel) looks quite different than pine boards (select) This is quite normal, and unfortunately unavoidable, even with much higher quality plywood like Baltic-birch ply if the goal were to match it to some some solid birch. Partly is it simply because wood can vary (and sometimes a lot). But also the ply's surface is a veneer — and ...


2

I have run into this same problem with the product in the past, and almost every time I have, it's been because of high humidity in the garage. Two things have helped: Sanding with a 320-400 grit paper between the coats. This helps knock down the bumps. Using a fan during the drying process. I use a heavy duty fan, and it seems to speed up the drying time. ...


2

Stain remover worked fine for removing most of the stain and other upper lacquer/sealer layers. A thin layer of veneer then was pressed on the door. All good without buying a new door. Todo: Upload before/after photos, alongside details. Update post after a year to report on the long-term effect.


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Use stain remover, and chip a thin layer of wood, then apply a new stain. But I doubt that the pressed veneer is thick enough to allow for any thinning. There's no fixing the existing veneer. Face veneers on plywood are very thin -- the internet says they're 1/30" on average, which means that half the time they're thinner than that. It might be a ...


2

I don't think there's an ideal solution here, and it's possible you're already getting close to the best result you can given the constraints. But as I read it there is still something to try, and that's doing the usual amount of sanding after raising the grain. Which is, just enough. TL;DR raise the grain with water, sand lightly, then proceed. The goal of ...


1

I think the assessment of how good this refinishing job is going to vary, and this subjectivity may lead to the Question ultimately being locked. However I think at least part of this isn't purely subjective.... Can you tell me if this is adequate workmanship? I think this is a good question to include since it can be assessed fairly objectively. And the ...


1

What is the difference between the 2 polyurethanes One is waterbased and the other is oil-based. Both dry 'fast', one because it's waterbased and these finishes tend to dry fast by their nature, the second because it's formulated specifically to make it dry faster than it would otherwise (oil-based varnishes tending to dry fairly slowly, even in ideal ...


1

Finish takes as long to dry as it takes, which can (far too often IMO) bear little resemblance to the manufacturer's guidelines! Oil-based products in particular are notorious for taking much longer than the stated time when the humidity is highish and/or the temps are low1. Also, with pigmented stains2 some degree of colour rub-off when topcoating is normal ...


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I only did the work less than a month ago so I am surprised that its already wearing down. That's likely why. Varnishes take time to complete the hardening process that converts them into their final cured form. This isn't just after they have dried. Broadly, it takes about a month1. What this means is that after varnishing something ideally one should wait ...


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Is a Pre-Stained Surface Food Safe? Yes. In fact it's as safe as if you hadn't used it at all. The reason is that pre-stain, IF you use it (see below), won't touch the food. So pretty much regardless of what it is it would be fine :-) But the thing is that "pre-stain conditioner", "stain prep" and other similar products are usually ...


1

I’m using Minwax Pre-Stain Wood Conditioner. I’m trying to find information on whether, after drying, my surface will be safe to prepare food on. I wouldn't use it. A pre-stain conditioner implies that you'll be following that with a stain of some sort, and then a finish. So to be safe, you'll need to be certain that not only this product, but also the ones ...


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