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22

There are certainly oils and other flammable liquids, plus possible electrical malfunction, so I would indeed suggest an ABC, preferably a larger one. Remember that you always aim an extinguisher at the base of a fire, not at the flames. However, it's important to note: Unless the fire is one you are sure you can put out quickly and easily, the most ...


10

This could work, but you would want them setup to run in parallel, and not in series I would think. For example at the end of your ductwork, you have a Y that splits right into the two vacuums. My guess is the stronger vacuum will end up with the majority of your dust. However if you set this up with a cyclone, you can still centralize all of the dust ...


10

There's two things to consider here: how much the machine throws dust all over the place, and how good dust collection is at the source. The circular saw and RAS are both going to throw dust with a fairly high velocity, and neither have good dust collection mechanisms. You could build one for the circ saw (as Jay Bates did for his circ saw) or a dust shroud ...


9

Hmmm. Where to start. While a cheap contractors table saw 'can' do a lot if you're willing to work at it, a full sized table saw will be much better, and a cabinet saw would be best. If you are using sheet material you'll either need to make a special table to help you cut or have an extra pair of hands to help. Clamps, Clamps, Clamps, you can never have ...


8

The advice for a shop is pretty much the same as for any loud activity. There is a lot of research you can do on the internet for music studios, for example, that will apply. So, this is not specific to woodworking1. The first question is what is your budget and how much work do you want to do? Ideally you would physically separate the walls from the floor, ...


8

You're probably OK with a typical 'multi-purpose' type ABC extinguisher, as that will handle most of the fires you would see in a typical woodshop. You could probably get away with just a type A (for burning solids), but type ABC are so ubiquitous that it may be more expensive for the single purpose extinguisher. if used in this small space, won't ...


7

There's a lot written about the ideal conditions for the workshop but you have to be careful about the source since the figures quoted aren't as universal as sometimes implied or stated, some sources not taking into account very different conditions to theirs (much drier or much damper). For example it's much damper in the British Isles generally than in ...


6

That is what I started with. I kept my eye on craigslist and garage and estate sales for a lot of my tools which worked well for me. I am not an expert cabinet maker, but on the few that i made, I used a router a lot for dado's and edge profiles. Also a basic set of chisels and a block plane are useful and can be had fairly cheaply. Even if you get these ...


5

Alternative answer: Don't get a fire extinguisher at all. They are only any good for tackling something the size of a wastepaper basket fire. It is far too easy to think "I can deal with this". The right way to tackle a fire is: Get out. Stay out. Call the big red truck out. (Source: I mishandled a fire from a toaster that caught light, and ended up ...


5

Blowing ash around with a CO2 extinguisher will make everything in the room dirty but most things can be cleaned of ash. That would be good for electricals. For wood, water or foam would be better (half a large CO2 extinguisher does very little for smouldering wood that can be dealt with by a cup of water). Powder is supposed to spread all round the room as ...


5

Specs are on line: you can do your own comparisons. Factors to consider: Brightness. A fair comparison would be between lamps delivering about the same number of lumens. Color temperature. Lower is, paradoxically, what we call "warmer color" -- more red, less blue, similar to incandescent, and higher color temp is "cooler" coloring with a shift toward blue....


5

This an iceberg of a topic - it's a difficult question to address in a short space. Here is a downloadable PDF from Popular Woodworking magazine that introduces an occasional theme called "I Can Do That". This PDF has a list of what tools to start with and how to pick them. These are mostly hand tools (i.e., powered hand tools) but the text covers quite ...


4

Well, large dust collector systems will somegimes run a bare copper wire from one end of thd ductwork to the other, grounding one end, due to (apparently unnecessary) fear of static-ignited dust explosions; you could try domething like that and see if it helps. Presumably you'd want to use stranded wire for flexibility. Please report back if you find ...


3

The answer provided by jdv is excellent advice and addresses sound transmission through air. Plus, as i mentioned in a comment, the mass of masonry walls and the earth will eliminate most sound transmission below grade. There may also be structural transmission to consider. If you have an interior surface that directly contacts the structural wall then sound ...


3

I am a bit late to this question, but I started out with not much more than you have. I decided that the best way to learn to build nice cabinets would be to build shop cabinets to learn on. I could work on my technique and use what I built to better organize my shop and if I made a mistake, it wasn't the end of the world. My first recommendation is a ...


3

I'm not sure it's possible to catch all the dust you make on any project, however the is no reason not to try. For quite a while I used a shop-vac to clean things up and many tools have connections to help in this endeavor, though you need to keep moving the shop-vac around to all your tools. On top of that they tend to be very loud, (much louder even than ...


3

For the many decades when incandescent was primary option for interior lighting, there was really only one color option - incandescent. Generally that fell into the Soft White color range around 2700K. CFL and LED lights introduced color temperature to the masses, and now you can find temperature ranges from 2700K - 6500K. Those range from the traditional ...


2

There are dust collection systems which are built with anti-static features at the collection point, hoses and tools. Festool is an example of such system where the hose and dust extractors work together to prevent static buildup. In this system, there is no wire used but rather the hose itself is capable of conducting electricity since it's made from a "...


2

I did a quick search using the terms "makerspace toronto" and came up with a number of links. One of the links is a collection of locations in the area. In such a metropolitan area as Toronto, you'll likely find a makerspace with a table saw. Additionally, makers in such organizations may have personally owned equipment. Our local makerspace does not have a ...


2

This is what's known as a Biesemeyer-style rip fence. A search on "Biesemeyer fence rigidity" yields interesting results, in particular this YouTube video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=alcXY7y4NS0 Apparently, 1/32" (0.030") is not unusual deflection for this cantilevered style of fence. The approach to stabilizing it seems to be clamping the end to the ...


1

You might try using one of those magnetic 'finger dealys' designed to hold your wood against the fence when cutting, but place it on the far back side of the fence to keep it from drifting.....have to be a little experimenting to determine the right amount of force to use before turning the magnets on (draw a line when you find your sweet spot with black ...


1

I think what your main question on this is what would be the difference be between fluorescent/incandescent and LED lights. If I were you I would go with LED lighting. My workshop is outside and using fluorescent takes a while to warm up, along with it as I am working they are picky. One flickers when I use the table saw and vacuum at the same time. When ...


1

I would also agree with the above answers in saying that the dust deputy is top notch. I ended up getting the entire kit to save myself some time in setup since I have a 1 year old that really cuts into my wood working. After buying my shop vac and dust deputy, I then needed to try and find adapters to fit my different machines. This can be a really ...


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