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6

Frankly, that post looks like it has served its days. I would replace it. However, to try and extend its life, I think the simplest solution would be to drill out the existing holes, glue in dowels and re-drill to accept the screws. Use an exterior grade wood glue (such as Titebond III) or even construction adhesive (like Liquid Nails or PL-Premium). Note ...


3

Wood screws work best as clamping devices. That is, no part of the screw fastener should engage with the top piece, leaving only the head of the screw to clamp the top piece to the bottom piece. This implies that, ideally, you drill two sizes of holes: pilot holes for the threads and relief holes for the shank. It follows that for those cases where the ...


3

If the dock is made from hardwood, then you want about a 7/16" pilot hole. If it is softwood, about 3/8" If possible, don't use screws at all, but rather use through bolts with nuts and washers. They will be much more secure long term. In general, you want the size of the pilot hole to be about that of the root diameter of the screw around the ...


2

The term you are looking for is a wood "plug." You can either cut a piece of dowel, or if you want control of the grain direction, use a plug cutter to cut your own. A flush-cutting handsaw can be helpful, as well. Regarding screws, you won't find a definitive guide, because the strength of a joint depends on what the joined object will be used for....


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