33

With the rip cut, you cut along the grain; while with the cross cut, you cut across the grain. Cutting along the grain is a very easy cut; even before you had mechanical saw, you had saws with few but large teeth so you cut as fast and as straight as possible. Essentially, you "rip" the wood apart, like you can split it with an axe, except you'll get a ...


32

Pascal Belloncle has already given a good explanation of why there are two different kinds of blades, but what is the practical aspect of it? An image speaks more than a thousand words: All cuts are done on the same piece of wood with a ryoba saw (one side rip, one side cross). You can immediately see that the rip cut with the rip blade goes twice as deep ...


12

I use 7.25" and 8" blades on a 10" table saw all the time, with no problem. You will have less depth of cut, of course, and also a reduction of rim speed,which will slightly increase chances of tearout, and slightly reduce risk of burning, both to a negligible degree under most conditions. Go for it.


12

The hook angle refers to the angle at which the teeth will engage the material being cut. A high or positive hook angle means the outermost tip of each tooth will engage very aggressively, whereas a low or negative hook angle causes each tooth to take a less aggressive bite. (Source) How do I choose a blade based on hook angle? Use a blade with a negative ...


10

You want to pay attention to the type of tooth grind, which describes how the individual teeth are shaped. Vermont American has a good resource for types of grinds. Any grind combination with at least one flat tooth should give you a flat-bottomed cut. So good candidates would be: Flat Top Grind (often used for ripping) Triple Chip Grind (for hard, ...


8

I think this is too broad to fully answer if asking about all saw types. Power saws I think can be grouped together for convenience and because the issues are fairly similar for all, but once you get to hand saws it's a whole different ballgame. Power saws For power saws, I think the idea of 'proper maintenance' may vary somewhat depending on the person. ...


8

Let's talk teeth! There are more types of grinds, but I feel these are the applicable ones for your question: Flat top (FT/FTB) An FT or FTB blade is one which has flat teeth that you're looking for. Alternate Top Bevel (ATB) An Alternate Top Bevel (It will be marked ATB on the blade) is one which has alternating beveled teeth, like the one you mentioned. ...


7

It's common to use 8" dado sets on 10" table saws. The main disadvantage of a smaller blade is simply that your maximum cut depth is reduced. There is also going to be a reduction in the speed at which the teeth meet the wood, and increase in torque. (Circumference is pi*diameter, so this is linear with blade size for a given RPM). That may affect cutting ...


6

Forrest sells a blade which is totally flat. If you have an old saw blade that needs resharpening, most sharpening companies can regrind your blade when they sharpen it to make it a flat top grind.


6

There are many more types of blade than you're listing here. For example, the grind angle of the teeth can make a big difference. This is different from the hook angle. So instead of answering for the specific combinations, which would be hard to do anyway, I'm going to try to be general. I'm also going to assume we're talking about sharp, clean blades. Any ...


4

Probably will not have an issue with the arbor but there are other issues to consider. Blade tip speed - making sure that the maximum rpm rating of the blade will not be exceeded by saw designed for a smaller blade. You other issue will be the saw will be more under powered with the larger blade. The larger diameter will require more power from the motor to ...


4

To add to rob's answer, it is unlikely that your saw's factory riving knife/splitter will be thin enough to pass through the smaller kerf. This may require you to remove the splitter or purchase/make one that will work safely with the blade kerf and diameter you are considering. If, however, your saw is not currently equipped with that safety measure, ...


4

If you are doing through cuts, your table saw's stock riving knife will not be close enough to the back side of the blade to prevent kickback. To address this, you can create a custom throat plate with an appropriately-sized and -located splitter.


4

It seems to me your question is really, "what will happen if I don't use the recommended type of blade for a given application?" Simply put: If you use a blade with too many (smaller) teeth and consequently shallower gullets, the gullets will not be able to carry away enough material and will clog, resulting in burning and possibly a wandering cut, as well ...


4

I'd put these in approximate order from most to least priority: making sure you use it properly - for example, don't cut steel with any of these blades/tools unless it's specifically rated for use with steel. Even then, if it's a motorized saw the speed needs to be adjusted/slowed. rust prevention - keep it free from corrosion cleanliness - buildup of pitch,...


3

When I'm spending money I like to read the negative reviews on a product online. This tells me what is wrong with them and I can decide if the issues are something I can deal with or if it happens to be an 'unlikely' occurrence. Now with a dado set, the first question would be how much would they likely be using them, and what quality of tools do they ...


3

Your eBay link is to a WILPU RWM 225 which their website calls a "reciprocating saw" blade. Based on their video on the 225 blade, this is for a tool that we (in the US, at least) would call a "Sawzall" (even if not made by Milwaukee) and looks like this: Image courtesy of Milwaukee.com If you click the "Sawzall" link (above), you'll see that depth of cut ...


3

Ok, so I called Hitachi to see if the machine was broken. They had me try and put the original blade back on, but the bolt holding the blade would not come off. It was like it was wielded on, even though I had taken the bolt off the night before. The guy at Hitachi said I should just bring it back to the store I bought it from saying, the bolt is ...


2

I believe you'll find that the split pin at the top of the blade holder is meant to engage a slot in the top of the blade, keeping it from pivoting on the attachment screw. That type of blade looks like this: You'd need to measure it carefully or test fit it to make sure it will work for you. Measuring might be easier given the package at a store is likely ...


1

Since it wasn't touched on in the Question and hasn't been addressed since do make sure your blade is clean. If you've been cutting a resinous wood, or certain sheet goods, the blade could have resin buildup on and around the teeth and this can significantly affect cutting performance. I wanted to lead with this as you mention you're a blade rookie so you ...


1

Aside from ensuring that your saw is set up correctly (e.g. that the blade is parallel to the bed and fence of your saw table), it's important to be aware of the different types of blade and how they will affect the cutting performance and finish. Ideally, you will use a ripping blade for ripping cuts and a crosscut blade for cross cuts - it's not just the ...


1

Your situation could be a couple of things. First, whatever you're using to brace/hold the workpiece as it meets the blade is not parallel to the blade. That could mean your blade is not parallel to the miter slot (which is most likely) or that you're using the original miter gauge to support the workpiece and its slide bar is loose in the miter slot which ...


1

I would start by getting a micrometer and making sure the blade is exactly parallel to the miter slot. If it's slightly off, the back end of the blade will hit the wood and burn it. Two, are you using a splitter to hold the piece open as you pass the piece through? Without a splitter the wood can close up on the blade and the back end of the blade will be ...


1

Okay, (rubs hands together)... ready for an answer. I'll try to combine information from the comments (and will happily edit based on feedback if I've misconstrued anything). To your question specifically. The T101 blades (or a similar generic) will turn tight curves because of its thin back and cut fairly cleanly. Don't worry about the supposed 15mm depth ...


1

I think (??) that it was a early carbide blade as carbide was really expensive to make, I have seen similar in old Sears catalogs.


1

It is possible it could be the blade, try turning the blade around backwards and see if the "high" spots become the "low" spots. A little bit of movement on the arbor can make a lot of movement on the end of the blade though. The washer that goes on the outside of the blade could not be sitting flat and allowing the blade to wobble as well. I used this video ...


1

Handheld (cordless) circular saws are the disposable razor blades of the sawing world. Mostly, you see them used on construction sites for rough work (trimming 2x4s and similar tasks), so the cut quality doesn't need to be all that great. A contractor is going to be more concerned with number of cuts/lifetime vs. cost, hence why you see a lot of carbide ...


1

You're overthinking this. Presumably, the tool was designed to work with any off-the-shelf blade you might buy, and does not require any space-age coatings, specific grind, etc. Depending on the manufacturer, there is a good chance that any aftermarket blade you buy will be higher quality than the blade that came with the tool. Of the factors you've ...


1

For what it's worth, I was primarily referring to... properly cleaning the blade with a mild solvent as detailed by Graphus in his answer storing the blade properly--i.e., not banging it around or throwing it in a drawer full of other loose bits and blades, which could damage and dull the teeth Treow and aaron also make good points about protecting the ...


1

Learning how to sharpen the blade is the biggest factor. It takes a lot of practice. The sharpness of the saw makes a huge difference in its performance. Microcorrosion is a big factor. You can prevent corrosion by using an alkaline paste. Mix beeswax, mineral oil and sodium hydroxide to make a paste and wax the blade with it.


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