46

Pascal Belloncle has already given a good explanation of why there are two different kinds of blades, but what is the practical aspect of it? An image speaks more than a thousand words: All cuts are done on the same piece of wood with a ryoba saw (one side rip, one side cross). You can immediately see that the rip cut with the rip blade goes twice as deep (...


41

With the rip cut, you cut along the grain; while with the cross cut, you cut across the grain. Cutting along the grain is a very easy cut; even before you had mechanical saw, you had saws with few but large teeth so you cut as fast and as straight as possible. Essentially, you "rip" the wood apart, like you can split it with an axe, except you'll get a ...


14

I use 7.25" and 8" blades on a 10" table saw all the time, with no problem. You will have less depth of cut, of course, and also a reduction of rim speed,which will slightly increase chances of tearout, and slightly reduce risk of burning, both to a negligible degree under most conditions. Go for it.


13

The hook angle refers to the angle at which the teeth will engage the material being cut. A high or positive hook angle means the outermost tip of each tooth will engage very aggressively, whereas a low or negative hook angle causes each tooth to take a less aggressive bite. (Source) How do I choose a blade based on hook angle? Use a blade with a negative ...


11

It's common to use 8" dado sets on 10" table saws. The main disadvantage of a smaller blade is simply that your maximum cut depth is reduced. There is also going to be a reduction in the speed at which the teeth meet the wood, and increase in torque. (Circumference is pi*diameter, so this is linear with blade size for a given RPM). That may affect cutting ...


10

You want to pay attention to the type of tooth grind, which describes how the individual teeth are shaped. Vermont American has a good resource for types of grinds. Any grind combination with at least one flat tooth should give you a flat-bottomed cut. So good candidates would be: Flat Top Grind (often used for ripping) Triple Chip Grind (for hard, ...


9

I think this is too broad to fully answer if asking about all saw types. Power saws I think can be grouped together for convenience and because the issues are fairly similar for all, but once you get to hand saws it's a whole different ballgame. Power saws For power saws, I think the idea of 'proper maintenance' may vary somewhat depending on the person. ...


8

Let's talk teeth! There are more types of grinds, but I feel these are the applicable ones for your question: Flat top (FT/FTB) An FT or FTB blade is one which has flat teeth that you're looking for. Alternate Top Bevel (ATB) An Alternate Top Bevel (It will be marked ATB on the blade) is one which has alternating beveled teeth, like the one you mentioned. ...


7

There are many more types of blade than you're listing here. For example, the grind angle of the teeth can make a big difference. This is different from the hook angle. So instead of answering for the specific combinations, which would be hard to do anyway, I'm going to try to be general. I'm also going to assume we're talking about sharp, clean blades. Any ...


6

Forrest sells a blade which is totally flat. If you have an old saw blade that needs resharpening, most sharpening companies can regrind your blade when they sharpen it to make it a flat top grind.


6

Obviously this is questionably safe, even if you can actually fit a 12" blade to your 10" radial-arm saw. While in most cases rotating the material and making multiple cuts works, there are some cases where this isn’t possible (say, the material is only flat on one side). There's a very simple and safe solution that should work for any situation ...


5

To add to rob's answer, it is unlikely that your saw's factory riving knife/splitter will be thin enough to pass through the smaller kerf. This may require you to remove the splitter or purchase/make one that will work safely with the blade kerf and diameter you are considering. If, however, your saw is not currently equipped with that safety measure, ...


5

If you are doing through cuts, your table saw's stock riving knife will not be close enough to the back side of the blade to prevent kickback. To address this, you can create a custom throat plate with an appropriately-sized and -located splitter.


5

It seems to me your question is really, "what will happen if I don't use the recommended type of blade for a given application?" Simply put: If you use a blade with too many (smaller) teeth and consequently shallower gullets, the gullets will not be able to carry away enough material and will clog, resulting in burning and possibly a wandering cut, as well ...


4

Probably will not have an issue with the arbor but there are other issues to consider. Blade tip speed - making sure that the maximum rpm rating of the blade will not be exceeded by saw designed for a smaller blade. You other issue will be the saw will be more under powered with the larger blade. The larger diameter will require more power from the motor to ...


4

I'd put these in approximate order from most to least priority: making sure you use it properly - for example, don't cut steel with any of these blades/tools unless it's specifically rated for use with steel. Even then, if it's a motorized saw the speed needs to be adjusted/slowed. rust prevention - keep it free from corrosion cleanliness - buildup of pitch,...


4

Although not foolproof, you can generally figure out which style to use in the saw by the way the blade connects to the saw. In general, if you need a tool to change the blade, it's a U-shank. If you can do it without a tool it's a T-shank. There are exceptions, and this looks to be one. Some especially old jigsaws take a U-shank blade with an additional ...


3

When I'm spending money I like to read the negative reviews on a product online. This tells me what is wrong with them and I can decide if the issues are something I can deal with or if it happens to be an 'unlikely' occurrence. Now with a dado set, the first question would be how much would they likely be using them, and what quality of tools do they ...


3

Thinking back to something Roy Underhill said on The Woodwright Shop, probably 30 years ago, I thought that the teeth of a crosscut blade were angled perpendicular to the stroke of the saw, so as to work like a knife blade slicing through the wood fibers. The rip blade teeth pointed straight down, so as to work like a wood chisel splitting the wood fibers ...


3

Your eBay link is to a WILPU RWM 225 which their website calls a "reciprocating saw" blade. Based on their video on the 225 blade, this is for a tool that we (in the US, at least) would call a "Sawzall" (even if not made by Milwaukee) and looks like this: Image courtesy of Milwaukee.com If you click the "Sawzall" link (above), you'll see that depth of cut ...


3

Ok, so I called Hitachi to see if the machine was broken. They had me try and put the original blade back on, but the bolt holding the blade would not come off. It was like it was wielded on, even though I had taken the bolt off the night before. The guy at Hitachi said I should just bring it back to the store I bought it from saying, the bolt is ...


3

The bigger blade will have more mass than the motor is designed to spin. This could cause issues for the motor, potentially burning it out. This is part of the reason that dado blade sets come in 8" size designed for use in a 10" table saw - you're adding multiple blades where only one normally goes, so by making the blade smaller, you're reducing ...


3

Really no, it's a deadly proposition. When these blades turn, the centrifugal force tries to tear them apart, so they have a maximum RPM rating which is usually written on the side. Larger diameter means lower RPM. However if you mount the larger blade on your saw, it will spin at the rpm of the motor designed for the smaller one, which means it will spin ...


3

I don't pause specifically to cool the blade when I'm cutting with any tool. I do, however, usually burn my fingers slightly if I have to change the blade because I always forget just how hot the things get. I usually have one glove handy if I need to change blades during cutting. I find that there are often pauses in my working as I readjust myself to cut ...


2

I think (??) that it was a early carbide blade as carbide was really expensive to make, I have seen similar in old Sears catalogs.


2

Okay, (rubs hands together)... ready for an answer. I'll try to combine information from the comments (and will happily edit based on feedback if I've misconstrued anything). To your question specifically. The T101 blades (or a similar generic) will turn tight curves because of its thin back and cut fairly cleanly. Don't worry about the supposed 15mm depth ...


2

I believe you'll find that the split pin at the top of the blade holder is meant to engage a slot in the top of the blade, keeping it from pivoting on the attachment screw. That type of blade looks like this: You'd need to measure it carefully or test fit it to make sure it will work for you. Measuring might be easier given the package at a store is likely ...


2

Should I let the jigsaw blade rest once it heats? Not usually, no. It's perfectly normal for jigsaw blades to get hot in use. Even hand saws can get uncomfortably hot1 if you're sawing enough and any traditional saw is made of plain carbon steel. Modern jigsaw blades should be made of much more heat-tolerant alloys that don't care even a little about ...


1

Your situation could be a couple of things. First, whatever you're using to brace/hold the workpiece as it meets the blade is not 90 degrees to the blade. That could mean your blade is not parallel to the miter slot (which is most likely) or that you're using the original miter gauge to support the workpiece and its slide bar is loose in the miter slot which ...


1

I would start by getting a micrometer and making sure the blade is exactly parallel to the miter slot. If it's slightly off, the back end of the blade will hit the wood and burn it. Two, are you using a splitter to hold the piece open as you pass the piece through? Without a splitter the wood can close up on the blade and the back end of the blade will be ...


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