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4

As clarified in the Comments, some of the abrasive used was silicon carbide paper (wet 'n' dry). The abrasive grains on this kind of paper fracture during use1, releasing a very fine grey/black dust. On the hard materials wet 'n' dry paper is suited to2 this dark residue isn't a problem, but obviously on wood it can become lodged in the surface. On some ...


4

It sounds like you keep your wheelbarrow outside, as I do. I recently sanded my wheelbarrow handles and treated them with "spar urethane" to solve the same persistent splinter problem you've described, and I expect it will prevent further oxidation and degradation of the wood during continued outdoor storage. "Spar urethane" or "...


3

ROSs are finish sanders, and not well suited to bulk material removal (except for beasts like the Rotex). But of course you can fit a coarse disk — and I mean really coarse1 — to any ROS to make it very aggressive. But maintaining flatness when removing this much material with a rotary sander is not easy..... I'm actually doubtful a dead-flat surface is ...


3

I used cloth adhesive tape. It worked well and probably has a better grip and feel than duct tape. You could also get some sports tape, like that used on hockey stick handles or baseball bats.


3

There's a reason we don't make a lot of furniture out of construction grade pine in North America. Not only is it grown fast with no regard for how it works with hand tools, but it is kiln-dried in a manner that allows it to be sold and turned into stick-frame constructions fast. Few are going to try and "finish" it. It sounds like you've done what ...


2

Normally you sand in the direction of the grain1 for best results. But this surface is all end grain, so that doesn't apply since technically the grain direction is outwards (towards the viewer). What you do with end grain is instead sand until no sanding marks are visible, and/or you're happy with the surface. Beyond that the sanding direction makes little ...


2

You could consider another option: don't refinish it at all. Depending on how damaged the existing finish it (you don't say or show) in most case light scuffs and dings are just part of the charm, and don't represent any problem with ability of the material to resist moisture. That veneer is very stable, with very good natural water resistance. On top of ...


2

I'd presume that you want fairly vibrant colors and you're talking reds and greens and blues, not 17 shades of oak or maple. You have hundreds, you say, so I'd suggest that you sacrifice a couple for test strips. Cut a few small pieces, and let them soak in a tub of the stain for an hour or two. The goal being to get the stain to deeply penetrate, not just ...


2

If the wood itself is reasonably sound, just rough, and the damage is deep enough that it will take considerable sanding to eliminate the gouges, I'd consider using a wood filler or epoxy to fill in the depths. Doing so will also help lock in the little bits that are sticking out trying to jab you every time you use it. It's been quite a while since I've ...


2

As I say in the Comment above, it is possible that just sanding deeper would resolve the problem with splinters1. It depends on the level of weathering whether this is viable; you don't want to sand too deeply and change the profile of the handles too much and/or weaken them, plus there's no non-destructive way of knowing in advance if it will work. So the ...


2

You may have unrealistic expectations when you say "I want it to look more like it used to before all the wear-and-tear...". The best you can probably hope for with furniture with this level of use/abuse is what is sometimes called "distressed" or "rustic". That means that you make it look better but accept the defects as part ...


2

Unfortunately this is one of those things which comes down to the ever-regrettable it depends. There are numerous variables that are important to any specific situation of sanding epoxy and they go beyond the basic question of high/low speed being better in general. Normally I would have asked what sander you're using (not just the type, but the exact sander ...


2

You should absolutely not apply mineral oil prior to painting. It will almost certainly interfere with the paint adhering and/or curing.


1

I thought maybe with application of some more coats it would smooth out, but that doesn't seem to be happening. If you were French polishing it could if you took it far enough (i.e. spent enough time on it!) but very broadly speaking grain was filled before application of shellac started, and this would have greatly lessened what you're seeing here I think. ...


1

You don't say what machine you have or the max height difference between your lowest and highest blocks. On my Supermax 19-38, I would start with 60 or 80 grit depending on that height differences. I prefer to glue things up with the minimum variance in height and then take as many light passes as needed to create an even surface. You can then go up to as ...


1

Great answers but there was one point I didn't see mentioned so I thought I would chime in. The work surface That's either pine or fir. A very soft wood, so even without cracks it will dent and scratch easily. Nothing less than epoxy will chemically seal it for more than a few uses. The stuff used on bar finishes is extremely hard, but a dough scraper will ...


1

I'm not sure what kind of wood I used for this project. It's pine, spruce, or fir. Those are used interchangeably in construction. These look like boards you might’ve purchased at a place like Home Depot. seal the wood cracks/voids - thereby make it basically impermeable for things like flour and wet dough and 2) toughen the surface Surface: The wood you ...


1

So, I don't have direct experience here, but I have a friend who does a lot of transfers to wood, metal, glass, etc. Here's what he said: Canvas gesso isn't good for ink. It's quite porous. He should probably start with a matte clear coat spray varnish. That's if he wants it to look like he's printing on wood. Otherwise, paint it, then varnish, then print, ...


1

Light sanding (320) cleaned up my mess quickly. Surprised that wiping with mineral spirits didn't work. I did notice that areas of wood exposed to the wet slurry (next to epoxy) did show filling of wood pores, but I don't think that's a problem in my case--just not that noticeable. I don't know anything about snakewood, but I'm guessing that the wet slurry ...


1

Thanks a lot to jdv and Graphus for they precious answer / comments. I thought I would post as an answer a description of what I've done, in case somebody faces the same issue. Take everything apart, Clean with soapy water, Apply a mix of 1/2 vinegar, 1/2 water, to the parts that were rusted, let rest 10 minutes and scrub lightly, following this advice, ...


1

I did figure out a way to get a little more life from the belts: I stop sanding every few seconds and rest the sander on the steel table of my table saw to cool the belt. They seem to go a little longer before they break when I do that. Based on the comments I received and on what I read in the other post that I mentioned in the question, I think the ...


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