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5

It depends on what you're doing. Those mouse detail sanders are for getting into corners and doing light-duty work. I would not call it a "general use" sander unless you have a lot of time to kill and enjoy having your hand go numb. For sanding edges, it may not be much more efficient than hand sanding. If you are sanding a small end table, it will take a ...


3

and I know the first job one must do is to sand and scuff the existing paintwork in order to help the new paint/primer adhere to the surface Actually the first job should often be to clean the piece if the goal is to provide the best base for uniform adhesion of the subsequent paint coats. While sanding or other abrasion can remove dirt and surface ...


3

There is no efficiency to be had here. If you want decent results, you will have to hand-sand using a selection of sanding blocks and sponges. But it depends on what you want. If you want a rougher "rustic" patina, you can use smaller power sanders with various fixtures and try to get most of the finish, leaving marks and going down to bare wood in ...


3

I belong to a makerspace which has a really great wood working section. My favorite tool is the laser cutter but I got tired of the look of 1/4" thick plywood and wanted to experiment with other woods. So I asked some of the other members to teach me how to resaw and render 1/4" "Laser food" stock out of cedar and pine 2x6's. We tried both the table saw ...


3

As per the Wood Database: Overall, Pond Pine works fairly well with most tools, though the resin can gum up tools and clog sandpaper. Pond Pine glues and finishes well. They claim Ponderosa Pine is a related species. These softwoods are easy to work, but they are an excellent source of tool-gumming resin. That being said, the same site claims: ...


2

I have the mouse sander and love it. I have used it mainly to refinish chairs as they have lots of nooks and crannies. However, it is very challenging to switch the tip out as the screw is teeny, and you will go through lots of sand paper as it seems to work through it rather quickly, and you will of course need to buy the paper that fits the sander. Also, ...


2

For work like this you need a collection of sanding blocks in various shapes, and sanding sponges, possibly cut into custom shapes. For faster removal this is one of the few situations where small rotary tools like a Dremel will come in handy. Almost certainly you will find all sorts of shaping and sanding attachments suitable for crafting rifle stocks. I ...


2

Unfortunately this is one of those things which comes down to the ever-regrettable it depends. There are numerous variables that are important to any specific situation of sanding epoxy and they go beyond the basic question of high/low speed being better in general. Normally I would have asked what sander you're using (not just the type, but the exact sander ...


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