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7

It sounds like you're running your bit too slowly. Spade bits are pretty sensitive to low speeds. A faster speed (and less feed pressure) will result in less material being removed with each pass. This, in turn leads to less force on the wood, resulting in less tearing of the fibers. This tearing of the fibers, instead of cleanly cutting them, is what ...


5

I'm not sure how well this will qualify as an answer as I have never tried to use mine on a 3hp shaper. I only wished to make a brief comment but it seems I don't have the rep points to leave comments yet. There's a safety concern involved so I hope the community will forgive me reaching out in the only way available to me. I have what appears to be the same ...


4

Normal grinding wheels are made from abrasive grit bonded together in a vitrified medium, so they're like a ceramic. This makes them hard and durable, but very brittle, and even the smallest defect can lead to catastrophic breakage which of course takes place at high rotational speeds, throwing the pieces off at very high velocities1. One of the functions of ...


4

Here is some details I found that are relevant: The slats and corner posts of a crib should be no more than 2 3/8 inches apart. Wider spacing poses an entrapment danger. Corner posts should be flush with the end panels (or no more than 1/16 inches higher). In a safe crib, the hardware — bolts, screws, and the like — should be firmly secured, with no sharp ...


3

Many monitor stands have the option of mounting with a clamp through a hole in the table as well as a clamp at the edge. This allows the mount to be placed further in from the edge. The hole is not ideal in a table used as a temporary desk, but is penalty fine in a dedicated deal if the monitor arm will be a permanent addition.


3

Billions of chemicals are stored correctly and safely indoors all over the planet. If it does not freeze or get very hot in your area and you can safely lock it up to prevent children or pests from access them then go for it. Temperature is a consideration for some chemicals.


3

According to this chart from Woodcraft, you were probably in the correct speed range for that bit. The real issue is that you are asking too much from a 1/4" shank router bit of this type. You'll notice that all of the reputable vendors (CMT, Whiteside, Freud) all use 1/2" shank for this type of bit. Small routers have their place, but this type ...


3

In the interest of building a decent article, here's what I have gleaned from a little internet sleuthing. The idea is to get pesticides into the canopy, and under the trunk-wood, but not in the sapwood (as I suggested in a comment). This breaks the lifecycle and also gets the larva where they do the most damage. Some of the soil, trunk-injection, and ...


2

There are many ways to do this, any of which can be made safe enough for the risk to be acceptable. I'll outline how I would do it, but there are probably a dozen slightly different variants that would also work just fine. I would use a template bushing on a plunge router with an oversized template to make the opening. Start by determining the radius on ...


2

Take a look at how wood is used to make load-bearing spans in any construction. For static loads, the idea is to transfer the loads to the floor, and thence to the ground, with minimal deflection (under normal loads) and without danger of sudden catastrophic failure. There are three main ways of achieving this: Use dimensions large enough to resist ...


2

You could consider another option: don't refinish it at all. Depending on how damaged the existing finish it (you don't say or show) in most case light scuffs and dings are just part of the charm, and don't represent any problem with ability of the material to resist moisture. That veneer is very stable, with very good natural water resistance. On top of ...


2

The low strength of the shaft as shown by the original failure and subsequent bend test, shows that the shaft was never hardened . So do not use this brand either because of poor quality control or poor planning. A shaft like this should be "hardened" , roughly to Rockwell C 35. This is about the hardness of socket or end wrench.


2

A complete alternative is what I have right here, which avoids cutting or drilling into your existing table. It's an offcut of 28mm beech kitchen worktop (the cutout for the stove/sink combination in my campervan, tidied up a bit) on kitchen cabinet legs. Worktop and legs are both from Ikea, though the legs are discontinued. The overall height is about ...


2

Mounting a monitor (selected as the heavier of the two) to a stand or arm assembly will change the leverage the mount can place on the foundation. If you consider the monitor directly above the base, the force is vertical and represents, generally speaking, the weight of the monitor and assembly. As the monitor is moved forward, the leverage increases, ...


1

While you're probably breaking every manufacturer safety recommendation in the book, there are a couple of improvements you can make. Something like a rectangular chunk of ply (should be 3/4" or so thick) can be clamped on the saw table to help you hold the piece being cut at 90 degrees. A small (sacrificial) stick parallel to the fence can keep the ...


1

Since nobody else has weighed in with a complete answer, I'll give it a shot. Jigsaws are pretty benign as cutting tools. Except for the obvious issue of putting a body part close to the blade, the most common thing for a jigsaw seems to be a blade binding and the whole saw hopping up and down, which is bothersome and might thump a finger. I'd suggest that ...


1

Thanks a lot to jdv and Graphus for they precious answer / comments. I thought I would post as an answer a description of what I've done, in case somebody faces the same issue. Take everything apart, Clean with soapy water, Apply a mix of 1/2 vinegar, 1/2 water, to the parts that were rusted, let rest 10 minutes and scrub lightly, following this advice, ...


1

First and foremost, please note this warning from the manual: Fitting of other purpose or different sized blades will void the warranty. Needless to say, you are doing this at your own risk. With the above out of the way, I have run all the tests that I needed: the blade is fixed and has no play (which suggests that the harbour nut is fully threaded as ...


1

I'm not sure this would be worth the time, even if you found a way to do it. A reciprocating blade doesn't like doing partial cuts. You will break blades like crazy even if you could find a way to get the cut started. Jigsaws aren't as eager to mangle the meat of unwary operators as other power tools, but you will still be hanging on for dear life for ...


1

It occurs to me that the primary reason for most static build-up in tooling like this is the use of a dust extractor. The small particles of wood swirling against hoses (which are good electrical insulators) builds up localized static charges. When some of those build up enough potential they can find each-other and eventually arc through to the nearest ...


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