Hot answers tagged

10

I have never tested it, but I would think that a chipper, with only two teeth, might be quite risky. In a standard blade the teeth are secured in their path by the blade disc which serves to guide and support the teeth in the desired path. Without the rotating mass of the blade disc, I would worry that it is much easier for something to go wrong to make ...


7

6.35mm is exactly 1/4". While the two are very close in size (I mean 0.35mm - how bad could it be?) when you have a chunk of metal spinning at ~20000RPM, it can get very bad very quickly. Your question about safety is very valid. Can you change to a 1/4" collet? Yes, if your router supports changing to a 1/4" collet. Otherwise, NO. If your ...


7

Is it safe to use just the chippers in a dado stack? No. The chippers are designed to do just that — chip out the middle of a groove being cut on either side by both outside blades. Some dado stacks come with instructions that state not to use the chippers without both blades, example from Freud, sixth bullet point from bottom: "Always use both ...


6

Obviously this is questionably safe, even if you can actually fit a 12" blade to your 10" radial-arm saw. While in most cases rotating the material and making multiple cuts works, there are some cases where this isn’t possible (say, the material is only flat on one side). There's a very simple and safe solution that should work for any situation ...


6

It sounds like you're running your bit too slowly. Spade bits are pretty sensitive to low speeds. A faster speed (and less feed pressure) will result in less material being removed with each pass. This, in turn leads to less force on the wood, resulting in less tearing of the fibers. This tearing of the fibers, instead of cleanly cutting them, is what ...


5

I have a similar saw and looking at your manual I think they meant to say don't use the head lock knob / lock down pin while cutting. That pin is meant to lock the arm in place in the down position so it can't move (which would make cutting impossible, and the only ways I can think to even try would be very dangerous). You push that pin in (and lock the ...


4

Normal grinding wheels are made from abrasive grit bonded together in a vitrified medium, so they're like a ceramic. This makes them hard and durable, but very brittle, and even the smallest defect can lead to catastrophic breakage which of course takes place at high rotational speeds, throwing the pieces off at very high velocities1. One of the functions of ...


3

The bigger blade will have more mass than the motor is designed to spin. This could cause issues for the motor, potentially burning it out. This is part of the reason that dado blade sets come in 8" size designed for use in a 10" table saw - you're adding multiple blades where only one normally goes, so by making the blade smaller, you're reducing ...


3

Radial arm saws always climb-cut. This means that all that radial energy in the cutting edge wants to drag the piece into the fence; it basically feeds itself into the work, causing the operator to need to hold it back. Climb-cuts are special because no matter what the material is, the cutting edge will find a way to make it easier: climbing out of the cut ...


3

With gravel and the glass , pretty close to 250 # . Not that much vertical stationary load : I would be concerned more with lateral movement . Significant lateral bracing is required. Some day someone may lean against it or someone may bump it. I see some diagonal bracing but I am not impressed. Full disclosure; I have built several stands , likely stronger ...


2

Same thing happened to me yesterday. How I ended up here. I was cutting out a 1/8"x1/8" groove. I only mention that, cause no way it was stress. Barely using the bit. I hate 1/4" shanks, after yesterday, I know even more why. Same router as you. Nearly the same setup. I was using the battery operated version. 3ah battery. Always in it. It runs ...


2

I know I'm really late to the party on this guys, but since I only heard half of the answer, I want to toss in. It is dangerous for two reasons: first, as stated, torque. It DOES take significantly more energy to move that many large blades. Especially when they're tearing through a substance as chewy as wood. The other one, as briefly touched upon by the OP,...


1

Really no, it's a deadly proposition. When these blades turn, the centrifugal force tries to tear them apart, so they have a maximum RPM rating which is usually written on the side. Larger diameter means lower RPM. However if you mount the larger blade on your saw, it will spin at the rpm of the motor designed for the smaller one, which means it will spin ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible