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As discussed in some of the answers to What is the difference between a sabre saw and a jig saw, the terminology has been used differently over time. What we call a scroll saw today (a stationary/benchtop tool with the blade fixed at both ends) was commonly called a jigsaw many years ago. (Source: craigslist) Today's handheld jigsaw (with the blade fixed ...


4

rob does a good job of covering the overall use of the tools. I find these discussions interesting since it is possible to be right but have different answers. All of these types of saws function in the same way. Some are better at dealing with intricate work and some are designed for rough jobs. It does not help that the names of these tools could be ...


3

As many posts have mentioned for a number of tools and techniques, the woodworking terminology waters are muddy. Your first image is what I would refer to as a scroll saw; however, in the past these were referred to as jig saws. The second two are what I would refer to as jig saws; however, they have also been referred to as saber saws. My understanding ...


3

Your eBay link is to a WILPU RWM 225 which their website calls a "reciprocating saw" blade. Based on their video on the 225 blade, this is for a tool that we (in the US, at least) would call a "Sawzall" (even if not made by Milwaukee) and looks like this: Image courtesy of Milwaukee.com If you click the "Sawzall" link (above), you'll see that depth of cut ...


1

I have a couple of examples of manufacturer terminology to present, which frankly only serve to reinforce the idea that these terms have had their meaning folded, spindled and mutilated by various marketing departments. At least in the late 1960s, Black & Decker was calling this thing a jigsaw: More recently we have a Craftsman Sabre saw: And a Sears ...


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