4

The problem was a dull bit, as suggested in the comments. I just purchased a new CMT full carbide bit and now everything works as expected. No smoke, no burn marks, just cutting. Although even if it is now possible to cut the hole in one go I decided to cut them in two steps. I use a palm base, so it feels more secure to remove material in smaller chunks. ...


3

Graphus mentions using a bushing in his comment on the OP. If you rout around the inside of the template, then a bushing will work to make your newly produced part smaller. If you rout around the outside of the template then a bushing will only serve to make the new piece larger. If you have an "outside" template, you could use the router to create a new, "...


3

I think this may be easier that trying to tweak existing tools to scale the work. My first inclination would be to make a copy of the existing template on paper. Then you can use almost any multi-function printer to make a copy, but reduce it by some percentage. In a related manner, I suspect there is software you can use that will reduce a scanned PDF to a ...


3

My guess is that you do not, in fact, have a flush cut bit, but rather a hinge mortising bit, such as the Freud 16-560, that is designed for templates that are slightly oversized. You can either get a proper flush trim bit, get a different bearing for the bit to make it cut flush, or modify your template to account for the offset.


1

I'd use a handheld circular saw. Clamp the workpiece securely. Plunge at one end, run full depth all the way along. Stop before the end. Repeat, on ~1/2" spacing. Clean out the mess with a chisel. You won't get 4" (unless you find a saw with a 10" blade), but you should get a decent enough depth for cords. ** When plunging, do not be tempted to drag the ...


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