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The thing with hand tools is that YOU are the key part that provides the consistency. When dealing with hand tools not everything will have a stop or dial or setting to make sure it's accurate. The assumption is that the user will be providing the necessary skill to make the fine details consistent. (This specific task is somewhat complicated by the fact ...


2

This is similar to beading curvy edges. Tools similar to beading tools can be used. Bring it close with whatever cutting tool you can - chisel, hand plane, knife or so. Then make a scratch stock to finish it off and to make it consistent everywhere. Scratch stock or beading tool can have whatever profile you want, but you have to file a piece of thin metal ...


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The only way I can round these corners right now is with a steel file, held at a very awkward and uncomfortable position, taking a very, very long time at each segment. Surely there must be a better way to do this. Use a strip of sandpaper or emery cloth. Drop one end through the hole and hold the ends with each hand so that the abrasive runs over the edge ...


2

As a one-off, my first hunch was to lop off big chunks with a hand saw, then go at it with a spokeshave. It looks like most of it can be done reasonably along grain-lines. If you know the radius, make a 1/4-round sanding block (sandpaper plane) by either making a radiused router sled or cutting something on a table saw with an appropriate-sized blade (6 ...


1

Commercially this type of deep profile will often be created using a spindle moulder1, a floor-standing machine sort of like a router table on steroids. But no small-scale professional woodshop or home woodworker would approach this as a single operation. Instead the profile would be broken up into portions that can be formed by separate shaping operations ...


1

Some kind of cabinet scraper might work. If you aren't familiar, they use a sharp square edge (as opposed to a knife edge) to scrape away wood. A hook is generally formed on the edge using a burnisher. Some people make them from old saw-plates but they might be softer than is ideal. Purpose built ones are cheap. A sharp one will take shavings like a plane, ...


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A well-executed roundover should require very little sanding. I might start at 240 grit. You can back your sandpaper with a sponge or wad of cloth so that it will conform to the edge even better than your hand will. A sharp bit and a light touch are key. I will note, though, that rounding over plywood edges can be problematic. The layered surface of ...


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