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33

With the rip cut, you cut along the grain; while with the cross cut, you cut across the grain. Cutting along the grain is a very easy cut; even before you had mechanical saw, you had saws with few but large teeth so you cut as fast and as straight as possible. Essentially, you "rip" the wood apart, like you can split it with an axe, except you'll get a ...


32

Pascal Belloncle has already given a good explanation of why there are two different kinds of blades, but what is the practical aspect of it? An image speaks more than a thousand words: All cuts are done on the same piece of wood with a ryoba saw (one side rip, one side cross). You can immediately see that the rip cut with the rip blade goes twice as deep ...


10

As a DIYer, there's no compelling reason for you to go out shopping for a 14" table saw. That said, if you're asking because there happens to be a 14" table saw available to you for an irresistible price, there's nothing inherently wrong with it, but there are some things to be aware of: If you're in the US, you won't be able to get 5 hp out of a ...


10

You can buy what you need already fabricated. Search "champfer strip". Here's a Home Depot link: http://www.homedepot.com/p/Alexandria-Moulding-3-4-in-x-3-4-in-Pine-Chamfer-Strip-Moulding-0W995-200RLC/206844349 If the 3/4" x 3/4" is too fat, here's a link to 1/2": https://www.patterson-online.com/itemdetail/WC1210 I'm sure you can find other options as well ...


8

Resawing is a type of rip cut (always, without exception). The reason for the different terms is that ripping cuts are all cuts along the grain but not all rip cuts are resawing. Resawing, as the term is used today, refers only to cutting a board across its thickness, i.e. sawing a thick board into two (or more) thinner boards. You are literally re-sawing ...


7

Generally how I do it is after ripping the wood, line them all back up. then flip every other board over the long way. If the board wants to cup, flipping every other board reduces how much it can cup, because each one will want to 'bend' in the opposite direction. By flipping them the long way it also helps with bows and twisting.


6

I would not want to start with 1/2" x 1/2" square stock unless you have a table saw. Trying to rip small stock with the tools you listed would be quite difficult (and dangerous). Instead, start with a bigger piece of stock, say 1x6. Mark a line 1/2" in from one edge. Put your circular saw at a 45 degree bevel and rip along that line.


6

Internal stresses in the board that are released when cut cannot be entirely predicted, no. A square, flat, straight board might rip or resaw into a problem piece. That being said, a cupped, bowed, or twisted board will often yield a smaller board with similar problems, even after going through the process of squaring / truing up.


5

Power tool For a simple, efficient power tool approach I would consider a plunge router using a known straight edge as a guide. Using a straight bit you could cut in where you want and exit just the same. Use the guide to keep your cut true. Image from PopularWoodworking.com If you think of these grooves as flutes there are jigs that can help with the ...


3

There are several ways to do this. The radial arm saw would probably be my last choice, though. If you can find material 1 1/2 - 2 1/2" thick then you could just rip strips off of this with your table saw. This would probably be the easiest. Rip cuts (where you're laying the board flat on the table and reducing its width) are what table saws are designed ...


3

I've never noticed any predictable pattern when ripping timbers. If you get a particularly strong or stubborn piece, you can knock some pre-cut timber wedges into the saw groove on the outfeed side in order to prevent excessive pinching, hammering/pushing them in as you go along.


3

You are correct, a table saw or any other circular saw is not the tool to use for a blind groove. As you have researched there are safety issues, plus the groove will be arched at the ends. It can be done, but is not recommended, especially in conjunction with a first project. The most common approach is to use a router mounted on a router table and use a ...


3

I could see these concepts getting confusing because there is some correlation between the two. As discussed in this answer ripping or a rip cut is: With the rip cut, you cut along the grain So ripping has nothing to do with the dimensions of the wood but the grain direction Resawing is the process of taking larger boards and converting them into ...


3

There is a distinction because the actions are different. You must make considerably different considerations when resawing than when ripping, and those considerations are not specific to the grain direction, but to the dimensions of the board. Resawing is splitting the thickness of a board, whereas ripping is splitting the width of a board. The thickness is ...


3

You can use whichever one is more practical for the size of your workpiece and your saw setup, but in general a miter gauge is not as well-suited to working with square stock. The miter gauge's capacity is limited unless you have an auxiliary infeed table, since it falls out of the track once it extends too far past the front of the table. Also, the bulk of ...


2

Before I get into the Answer proper I wanted to say that I'm presuming from the outset that you don't need to produce perfect blanks like many commercial ones are. That level of finish is useful for marketing and sales because it gives a clearer picture to prospective buyers of exactly what they're getting, but you don't need to aim for that since you have ...


1

As the others said, no true prediction. It has to do with internal stresses and cutting the board releases them. It might have to do with where the wood came from in the tree (a leaning tree or branch is more likely to have stress wood when cut into lumber) Some of it can be how the wood was dried. Case hardening etc. There is a good chance that if it'...


1

Thinking back to something Roy Underhill said on The Woodwright Shop, probably 30 years ago, I thought that the teeth of a crosscut blade were angled perpendicular to the stroke of the saw, so as to work like a knife blade slicing through the wood fibers. The rip blade teeth pointed straight down, so as to work like a wood chisel splitting the wood fibers ...


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