27

Is this considered safe? It can be done safely. A tall fence, featherboards, and good push stick make a big difference. Not everyone takes the time to set all that up, though, so it's worth pointing out that (like any TS operation) it can also be done unsafely. If so, what are the rules of resawing on a table saw? Equipment: tall fence: The big ...


13

The operation you want to do is called resawing, and is best done on a bandsaw. Ideally, your bandsaw should be equipped with a 1/2" or wider, 2-4 TPI blade and a resaw guide or high fence that can be easily adjusted for blade drift (just in case you haven't yet mastered Alex Snodgrass' drift-free bandsaw setup technique). (Source) The bandsaw will leave ...


10

The danger when resawing on the table-saw lies in kickback due to the internal stresses which may cause the log to pinch the blade. This is less of a risk on a band-saw because if it does pinch then the log will be pulled down into the table.


9

Resawing is a type of rip cut (always, without exception). The reason for the different terms is that ripping cuts are all cuts along the grain but not all rip cuts are resawing. Resawing, as the term is used today, refers only to cutting a board across its thickness, i.e. sawing a thick board into two (or more) thinner boards. You are literally re-sawing ...


8

Which tool would be best to accomplish this Of the saws you list I think the pull saw is the best choice, in fact while it's theoretically possible to do it with one or two of the others doing it with the pull saw may be the only reasonable option. The Japanese routinely resaw boards by hand with their saws* and many Western woodworkers who use Asian-...


7

It's called resawing, and generally it is done with a bandsaw. There are blades that can make this process easier. Getting the largest (wide) blade you saw can handle is the best way, at least for wide boards. I've used fairly small boards and cut them in half, 3/4" in half with thinner blades. but you get a lot of wobble, especially if you don't have a ...


6

The limit in size you can resaw width and height-wise is established by what size wood can fit through the exposed blade area of the bandsaw, so measure the distance between the blade and the support column that holds the upper blade wheel and the length of the exposed blade and you have your maximums. Length-wise, of course you can go on forever, provided ...


5

I would resaw first. An 8" resaw is going to take lots of skill and luck to achieve. If the 8" board is only slightly out of plumb (an issue of skill) at any point during the cut, you will very likely end up with a place where the thickness goes below 1/4", necessitating a do-over. If you make a resaw on a 4" board, the effect of a bit of jiggle out of ...


3

I could see these concepts getting confusing because there is some correlation between the two. As discussed in this answer ripping or a rip cut is: With the rip cut, you cut along the grain So ripping has nothing to do with the dimensions of the wood but the grain direction Resawing is the process of taking larger boards and converting them into ...


3

There is a distinction because the actions are different. You must make considerably different considerations when resawing than when ripping, and those considerations are not specific to the grain direction, but to the dimensions of the board. Resawing is splitting the thickness of a board, whereas ripping is splitting the width of a board. The thickness is ...


2

Adjust your thinking. You've noted that you're trying to make some trim pieces. I can't, for the life of me, envision what you need 1x1/8" trim for, but I'll assume you need it and that's the perfect size for what you're after. (Oh! You're making doll-houses or other scale models! Of course.) I'd suggest that you rip your wood in 1/4" wide strips, ...


2

Just to clarify, as I understand your question you want to turn your 2 1/2" thick slab into two slabs that are each the same size but 1"+ thick? This operation is called "resawing". Typically this would be done with a bandsaw, however most home-shop bandsaws max out at around 1' of resaw capacity. For your slab you will need something with a much bigger ...


2

I would recommend gluing them up first. Even with good gluing platforms to hold the boards flat during glue up and a good clamping setup, there will always be a bit of unevenness. The amount of offset will be the same regardless of the thickness. If you resaw first you will have the same unevenness twice, doubling the waste that must be planed off for ...


1

I have resawn up to 6" with a 14" band saw with a 1/3rd hp motor, painfully slow. A good resaw blade makes all the difference. All of that said 3/4 hp or better.


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