11

I like a belt sander when I need to really remove some material like paint for example, I think it cuts better. an Orbital I like for finer sanding it offers a lot more control.


7

One option would be to clamp or otherwise secure sacrificial wood to the table edges, extending the portion that would be rounded off to be outside of your desired surface. The added wood should have the top surface level with the table surface. The sanding pad will follow the new surface, which would not require that you approach the edge, or if you did, ...


5

I usually use my belt sander for large surface where I need to remove a lot of material, such as an uneven biscuit joint. To be honest, I also use it when my patience is running low and my orbital or 1/3 sheet sander is not fast enough... Although, it's not really related to woodworking, I found a belt sander really useful to level an even sub-floor ...


5

When you want to sand more aggressively, you use a faster speed. When you want to sand more gently (to take greater care not to sand through veneer or finish for example) you would drop to a lower speed1. Just to note, final sanding of wooden surfaces should normally be done by hand to help reduce the chance of 'pigtails' or sanding swirls2 and to ensure ...


4

When that dries, its gritty ... even after the 3-4 coat. This is likely because the first coat of finish caused some roughness to emerge1, referred to as 'raised grain', and you didn't tackle it then. When this happens you need to sand after the first coat of finish has dried enough that it's easily sandable (about a day, sometimes less and sometimes more) ...


3

The faster it spins, the more material it will remove. When sanding solid wood, I go full speed. But, if I am sanding a coat of poly or a plywood veneer, I go at it with a much slower speed as to not chew through the top layer of material.


3

Have you considered "sanding the finish"? Here's the basic idea: Let the finish fully cure. This usually takes a couple of weeks. You will know it's fully cured when you sniff it and can't smell the finish. Sand with an abrasive, such as 0000 steel wool. This will create a finish smooth to the touch, but will dull the sheen. That may be what you want (if ...


3

and I know the first job one must do is to sand and scuff the existing paintwork in order to help the new paint/primer adhere to the surface Actually the first job should often be to clean the piece if the goal is to provide the best base for uniform adhesion of the subsequent paint coats. While sanding or other abrasion can remove dirt and surface ...


3

There is no efficiency to be had here. If you want decent results, you will have to hand-sand using a selection of sanding blocks and sponges. But it depends on what you want. If you want a rougher "rustic" patina, you can use smaller power sanders with various fixtures and try to get most of the finish, leaving marks and going down to bare wood in ...


3

I find myself using my belt sander less and less. I really only use it when I need to remove a lot of material, whether that is a finish or if it is rough. I find that for years I only use it if I need 60 or 80 grit work done, or I have a very large area, like a table top where the belt sander will get the job done much faster. But even there, if I go ...


2

I find the belt sander is good for larger pieces, especially long one like planks and boards. I used it for cleaning boards from pallets that I disassemble. Hands down it is much faster. Just need to be extra careful not to stay in one place too long (Sanding in general is like that I suppose but the faster the tool the greater the risk.) Orbital sanders, ...


1

You don't mention the rough dimensions of the piece, or whether it is hard or soft or in-between. It's possible, of course. This was how wood was brought into the shop and then resawn or already rough sawn. There is a whole practice of preparing stock for actual use with hand tools. As you've noticed, sandpaper is not the right tool. Sandpaper isn't for ...


1

I have flattened boards with a random orbital sanders before, you will need a straight edge to mark all the high points with a pencil and sand them down. With a good straight edge you can get the surface extremely flat. I recently used a long steel Starrett straightedge and a orbital sander to flatten a massive table top made from sandwiched 2x4s. A quick, ...


1

It could be glue. It ends up in some strange places. I would thoroughly sand the area to bare wood and reapply the finish. I recently had a spot show up in the middle of a board. Just my 2 cents.


1

90% of my finishing jobs I use the random orbital sander as well. The only time I use the belt sander vs the orbital sander is when i need to either: Remove a LOT of wood really quickly Cleaning large pieces of wood or Flattening large pieces


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