13

The hook angle refers to the angle at which the teeth will engage the material being cut. A high or positive hook angle means the outermost tip of each tooth will engage very aggressively, whereas a low or negative hook angle causes each tooth to take a less aggressive bite. (Source) How do I choose a blade based on hook angle? Use a blade with a negative ...


12

You are, indeed, using your radial arm saw correctly, but it's important to note the critical differences between the two tools. In both cases, you would be making a climb cut when pulling the blade toward you. A climb cut is generally less safe because the blade literally tries to "climb" over the wood as it pulls itself into and over the wood. If you ...


7

Welcome to stackexchange. I'm not exactly sure I understand your question, but I think I do. Have you considered attaching it with machine screws? Maybe you can attach/detach with wing nuts or star knobs? I've actually done something similar with my crosscut sled on my table saw. I have a piece of 1/4 in ply in the center where it meets the kurf. I switch ...


6

Obviously this is questionably safe, even if you can actually fit a 12" blade to your 10" radial-arm saw. While in most cases rotating the material and making multiple cuts works, there are some cases where this isn’t possible (say, the material is only flat on one side). There's a very simple and safe solution that should work for any situation ...


3

Really no, it's a deadly proposition. When these blades turn, the centrifugal force tries to tear them apart, so they have a maximum RPM rating which is usually written on the side. Larger diameter means lower RPM. However if you mount the larger blade on your saw, it will spin at the rpm of the motor designed for the smaller one, which means it will spin ...


3

The bigger blade will have more mass than the motor is designed to spin. This could cause issues for the motor, potentially burning it out. This is part of the reason that dado blade sets come in 8" size designed for use in a 10" table saw - you're adding multiple blades where only one normally goes, so by making the blade smaller, you're reducing ...


3

Radial arm saws always climb-cut. This means that all that radial energy in the cutting edge wants to drag the piece into the fence; it basically feeds itself into the work, causing the operator to need to hold it back. Climb-cuts are special because no matter what the material is, the cutting edge will find a way to make it easier: climbing out of the cut ...


1

I believe that the problem appears with the introduction of the sliding capability. If—in the cutting motion—the saw blade merely tilts, the forces onto the piece are always down/or to the fence, hence there is no force trying to lift the piece (on square cuts). Instead, when cutting a wide piece- as wide as allowed by the sliding stroke, and the ...


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