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6

I don't think that any of your proposed solutions really address the heart of the problem. The core issue here is that the material you used for the top is not rigid enough. 1/2" ply is not generally thick enough for large structures like table tops and cabinet boxes. For that you'd really want to use at least 3/4" (19mm) ply. (Typically 1/2" material is ...


6

This looks like a problem commonly encountered when the clearance hole in the first board (the one on the outside of the joint - in your case the vertical piece) is not wide enough. This hole should be at least as wide as the widest part of the screw threads. The true pilot hole in the second piece should be sized appropriately for the screw and type of wood....


5

Putting aside your long-term goal for this for the moment, there are indeed many ways you can prepare plywood edges for paint. And as you can imagine there's quite a bit of advice out there on this with various recommendations as a quick Google search will show. One method that is fairly commonly repeated and seems to work very well from the pics I've seen ...


3

I don't think Makita has this feature. Also, it does not really help on the Festool machine in my experience. A good technique is to not cut completely with the first cut but only the first 1 or 2mm. Then, make sure the track is in the same position and make the final cut. My Mafell MT55cc has an extra setting for this kind of cut which also moves the blade ...


2

If the plywood is of the right type it doesn't need to be sealed as far as protecting it goes, exterior-grade plywood is supposed to be resistant as-is. One classification of exterior plywood is WBP which stands for Water and Boil Proof (that's literally how it is tested). The reason to coat your hot tub cover should be to maintain its looks, and if the ...


2

I am not sure of the metric sizes but 1/4" baltic birch* ply with a frame of 3/4" x 1 1/2" of a construction grade wood has worked for me on a crate about 24" x 12" x 5" was shipped several times. Sorry for the imperial measurements we should in the US have gone metric many years ago. *lauan plywood will also work although not nearly as durable


2

I did a quick search using the terms "makerspace toronto" and came up with a number of links. One of the links is a collection of locations in the area. In such a metropolitan area as Toronto, you'll likely find a makerspace with a table saw. Additionally, makers in such organizations may have personally owned equipment. Our local makerspace does not have a ...


2

The issue is that the top shelf is shorter than the other two. You have three choices (four if you count do nothing). Shorten the other two to match. Widen the top shelf with a shim cut to match the gap. If you don't have access to a saw that can cut that fine, go buy some veneer banding from Home Depot. Two or three layers should do it by the look of ...


1

My best attempt was cutting with a thin saw the vertical cut (I used a mini Dozuki saw) followed by incisions from the side with a sharp chisel. It's important to set your depth of cut in a manner that it ends at the limit of a ply in the plywood. This will ensure a clean edge. Much cleaner than the plough plane. I also used the chisel to clean ply ...


1

Here's what I did It's been cold and wet here so it was a while before I could get back to finish this. Here is what I ended up doing. Added a second coat to the lighter sections. This was closer but still not identical. Heavily sanded the darker section once fully dried. Allowing it to dry prevented it from gumming up the sandpaper. This removed the ...


1

(This feels like there is already Q&A about this, but I cannot find it. It might be hidden in a comment or one of the many good Answers by @Graphus on finishing.) The comment is on the right track: follow the instructions on the tin for applying another layer to all pieces, possibly thinning it out a bit and being careful to apply evenly (again, read ...


1

Yes, this will be stable with humidity. Particle boards are much more susceptible to moisture damage. Plywood will be strong. If you're worried you can cover it with an appropriate paint which will seal it and make it resistant to spills of oils and water (and other stuff that we get on our hard working workbenches).


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