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6

I don't think that any of your proposed solutions really address the heart of the problem. The core issue here is that the material you used for the top is not rigid enough. 1/2" ply is not generally thick enough for large structures like table tops and cabinet boxes. For that you'd really want to use at least 3/4" (19mm) ply. (Typically 1/2" material is ...


6

This looks like a problem commonly encountered when the clearance hole in the first board (the one on the outside of the joint - in your case the vertical piece) is not wide enough. This hole should be at least as wide as the widest part of the screw threads. The true pilot hole in the second piece should be sized appropriately for the screw and type of wood....


4

Why not make some smaller test pieces on some scrap pieces of the birch veneer plywood. Etch small but similar patterns. Then finish these test pieces to see which type of finish you like better and best achieves your objectives. Some part of asking for finishing advice is going to get you opinions based on other folks preferences. It is highly likely that ...


3

You could use 2x2 (actually 1.5 inch square) as an integral frame to join each plywood piece at right angles. With 2.5 inch screws it would be a strong structure. Keep the entry holes small, and always have a back door available for the little guys. At each entry you could build a "rattle-trap" that makes a noise when the cats approach each door. It would ...


3

I've been told Polyurethane is the best option if I don't want to change the wood at all That's not right, because "polyurethane" is a catch-all phrase for all clear finishes that include some polyurethane1 and only one type does little to change the wood's colour. When someone just says "poly" they might mean one of at least three very distinct products ...


3

Moving from side-to-side like this is called "racking". It involves the piece going out of square. Essentially the joints you have between the top and the legs do not provide sufficient support against the pieces pivoting relative to each other. Typically you'd prevent this by having some sort of diagonal bracing. This could be just a small bracket, or ...


3

The tapered bits are the proper bit for that process. You can by (and most do) with just using a properly sized standard drill bit. Here is a chart for screw size vs bit size based on the type of wood you are drilling into: Wood Screw Pilot Hole Sizes The standard bits are more useful overall, so if you don't want to spend the money now on the tapered ...


2

If the plywood is of the right type it doesn't need to be sealed as far as protecting it goes, exterior-grade plywood is supposed to be resistant as-is. One classification of exterior plywood is WBP which stands for Water and Boil Proof (that's literally how it is tested). The reason to coat your hot tub cover should be to maintain its looks, and if the ...


2

I am not sure of the metric sizes but 1/4" baltic birch* ply with a frame of 3/4" x 1 1/2" of a construction grade wood has worked for me on a crate about 24" x 12" x 5" was shipped several times. Sorry for the imperial measurements we should in the US have gone metric many years ago. *lauan plywood will also work although not nearly as durable


2

The issue is that the top shelf is shorter than the other two. You have three choices (four if you count do nothing). Shorten the other two to match. Widen the top shelf with a shim cut to match the gap. If you don't have access to a saw that can cut that fine, go buy some veneer banding from Home Depot. Two or three layers should do it by the look of ...


2

I did a quick search using the terms "makerspace toronto" and came up with a number of links. One of the links is a collection of locations in the area. In such a metropolitan area as Toronto, you'll likely find a makerspace with a table saw. Additionally, makers in such organizations may have personally owned equipment. Our local makerspace does not have a ...


1

Here's what I did It's been cold and wet here so it was a while before I could get back to finish this. Here is what I ended up doing. Added a second coat to the lighter sections. This was closer but still not identical. Heavily sanded the darker section once fully dried. Allowing it to dry prevented it from gumming up the sandpaper. This removed the ...


1

(This feels like there is already Q&A about this, but I cannot find it. It might be hidden in a comment or one of the many good Answers by @Graphus on finishing.) The comment is on the right track: follow the instructions on the tin for applying another layer to all pieces, possibly thinning it out a bit and being careful to apply evenly (again, read ...


1

If you don't want to use screws that's fine, many woodworkers have a philosophical objection to them (not just when seen, using them at all) and they're entitled to that view. Except for utilitarian stuff like workshop storage I totally get it when the screws would be visible, I hate that too unless they're firmly part of the design1, but it is a shame not ...


1

Cut a piece of 3/4" plywood 4" wide and 2" less than the width of the shell. Glue and screw it to the back panel to add rigidity.


1

I used cinder blocks, buried but standing about 4 " above the soil.I layed treated 2 X 4 on the cinder block with no anchoring ( no wind concern). I spill a lot of water so I made floor of house brick , no mortar. It has worked well for 15 years.


1

Yes, this will be stable with humidity. Particle boards are much more susceptible to moisture damage. Plywood will be strong. If you're worried you can cover it with an appropriate paint which will seal it and make it resistant to spills of oils and water (and other stuff that we get on our hard working workbenches).


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