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8

So I was wondering if an electric planer would do a better job at making those edges straight? Yes. In addition to being far far faster it is much more likely to result in straighter edges. It's possible a planer could straighten the edge pictured in just one or two passes, the work of perhaps 5 seconds. Unfortunately details of how you'd do this work ...


5

Are there any other options open to me? There is one other option that you didn't mention. You can build a "router sled" to flatten wide boards. This is basically two rails on either side of the board with a narrow platform that slides along them. A router rides on the platform, and the platform has a slot cut through it that the bit projects through to ...


3

It's funny that all of the answers have talked about how to prevent snipe, but nothing actually addressed your question of how to fix the board now. I would glue "rails" onto both edges of your workpiece that are thicker and longer than the piece itself. They will have to be long enough on both ends to absorb the snipe that you're getting, and the ...


2

I haven't built one for my planer (yet) but after posting a similar question here, I learned that one can construct a planer sled. A search returns far too many very useful links, especially many videos. The sleds fall into a couple categories, but are based on a flat board onto which your work piece is placed. The aft end of the sled has a stop block at a ...


1

it's been my experience that unless you have a table that supports the lumber going through the planer (at more than half the length, maybe 2/3) and of course level, that you will get snipe without a little extra help. I usually pick up the ends both when starting a feed and near the end of the feeding, since the snipe occurs when the board is not supported ...


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