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Wooden-bodied planes were very commonly oiled (sometimes heavily) with linseed oil and the same could be done with the body of a transitional plane. Many transitionals restored by present-day users are oiled, sometimes on all surfaces. Apparently transitional planes were sometimes originally sold with a film finish on them instead of oiling1, and despite how ...


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Thanks for the information everyone. It is indeed a ice plane (shaver)


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What is the difference between the jointer blade and the smoothing blade? I would have thought this was covered in the text. I haven't had the chance to read The Anarchist's Tool Chest but I would imagine elsewhere it describes the different ways an iron can be set up. Are they ground to different bevel angles? No it's not about the bevel angle, it's ...


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I recently purchased the same router plane as well along with the fence which I haven't used yet, but after cutting my first few dados, I can see why it would be helpful. I'm new as well so I imagine that with experience, you may not need the fence. The fence is to keep the blade parallel to an edge, which is the same purpose as on the plow plane. For the ...


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As with all tools, it depends. The cheaper ones or ones used by construction workers for timber framing are not suitable for woodworking. Surface quality left by electric planers varies. They are not all equal. Some even have spiral blades that leave a very smooth finish that requires little to no sanding. As for uses, a high-end electric planer, such as ...


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